Chapter 1. Growth and Form: What is the Aim of Biomineralization?

  1. Prof. Dr. Edmund Bäuerlein
  1. Edmund Bäuerlein

Published Online: 20 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9783527619443.ch1

Handbook of Biomineralization: Biological Aspects and Structure Formation

Handbook of Biomineralization: Biological Aspects and Structure Formation

How to Cite

Bäuerlein, E. (2007) Growth and Form: What is the Aim of Biomineralization?, in Handbook of Biomineralization: Biological Aspects and Structure Formation (ed E. Bäuerlein), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527619443.ch1

Editor Information

  1. Max-Planck-Institute for Biochemistry, Department of Membrane Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz 18 A, 82152 Planegg, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 20 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 25 MAY 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527316410

Online ISBN: 9783527619443

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Keywords:

  • peptides;
  • induced structures;
  • low homologies;
  • nucleation;
  • filaments;
  • pores;
  • polysaccharides;
  • unified theory;
  • composites;
  • finite element analysis;
  • stability

Summary

12-Amino-acid peptides with binding-selected sequences and random functional groups synthesize the same inorganic material. Bacteria use structured polymers as filaments of cytoskeletal protein and of polysaccharides in templating biominerals. Nucleation appears to be involved not only in crystal formation, but also in the formation of porous or amorphous inorganic material. A seed of one iron ion for an iron-oxide cluster could be obtained in the low-iron-state of an archeal ferritin crystal. Porous inorganic materials were described to grow out in huge channeled complexes of organic compounds or crystallized seawater. The evolutionary progress of biomineralization runs apparently in the development of complex, inorganic-organic hybrid materials, composites, which are often structured hierarchically. The mechanical properties of a mineral undergo a change by presence and partition of the organic material, the most prominent example being the human skeleton. In order to describe such a complex system, a mathematical procedure - the finite element analysis - was introduced with great success. This analysis is governed amazingly by only one physical quantity, force, together with the modulus of elasticity. The overwhelming extent of research into the mechanical properties of skeletons has resulted in the conclusion that the aim of biomineralization appears to be stability.