Chapter 14. Organic Matrix and Biomineralization of Scleractinian Corals

  1. Prof. Dr. Edmund Bäuerlein
  1. Sylvie Tambutté,
  2. Eric Tambutté,
  3. Didier Zoccola and
  4. Denis Allemand

Published Online: 20 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9783527619443.ch14

Handbook of Biomineralization: Biological Aspects and Structure Formation

Handbook of Biomineralization: Biological Aspects and Structure Formation

How to Cite

Tambutté, S., Tambutté, E., Zoccola, D. and Allemand, D. (2007) Organic Matrix and Biomineralization of Scleractinian Corals, in Handbook of Biomineralization: Biological Aspects and Structure Formation (ed E. Bäuerlein), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527619443.ch14

Editor Information

  1. Max-Planck-Institute for Biochemistry, Department of Membrane Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz 18 A, 82152 Planegg, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 20 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 25 MAY 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527316410

Online ISBN: 9783527619443

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Keywords:

  • calcification;
  • carbonate;
  • calcium;
  • calicoblastic ectoderm;
  • exoskeleton;
  • cnidarian

Summary

In scleractinian corals, biomineralization leads to the formation of a calcium carbonate exoskeleton. This process is biologically controlled and involves a mineral fraction of calcium carbonate and an organic fraction named the organic matrix. Corals are phylogenetically basal metazoans, possess a simple anatomy, can be easily manipulated for physiological studies, and possess a majority of genes in common with vertebrates. They are therefore good models for biochemical, physiological, and evolutionary studies concerning either the transport of ions or synthesis of organic matrix involved in biomineralization processes. This chapter focuses on the current state of knowledge of the organic fraction, from its synthesis by the tissues to its incorporation in the skeleton.