Chapter 10. Using Ice to Mimic Nacre: From Structural Applications to Artificial Bone

  1. Prof. Dr. Edmund Bäuerlein
  1. Sylvain Deville,
  2. Eduardo Saiz and
  3. Antoni P. Tomsia

Published Online: 20 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9783527619443.ch34

Handbook of Biomineralization: Biological Aspects and Structure Formation

Handbook of Biomineralization: Biological Aspects and Structure Formation

How to Cite

Deville, S., Saiz, E. and Tomsia, A. P. (2007) Using Ice to Mimic Nacre: From Structural Applications to Artificial Bone, in Handbook of Biomineralization: Biological Aspects and Structure Formation (ed E. Bäuerlein), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527619443.ch34

Editor Information

  1. Max-Planck-Institute for Biochemistry, Department of Membrane Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz 18 A, 82152 Planegg, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 20 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 25 MAY 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527316410

Online ISBN: 9783527619443

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Keywords:

  • biomineralized structure;
  • nacre;
  • biomimetics;
  • ice;
  • freezing;
  • ceramic;
  • composites;
  • particles segregation;
  • multilayer

Summary

Materials that are strong, ultra-lightweight and tough are in demand for a range of applications from automotive to medical. These requirements will best be met by new composite materials, the components and interfaces of which are engineered at the molecular level, and the architectures of which are carefully designed from the meso-scale down to nano-scale dimensions while combining the favorable characteristics of several components. Nacre (seashells) and bone are frequently used as examples for how Nature achieves this through biomineral-ized, hybrid organic-inorganic composites that are highly optimized for specific functions. Unfortunately, it has proven extremely difficult to transcribe nacre-like clever designs into synthetic materials, in part because their intricate structures need to be replicated at several length-scales. In this chapter we describe how nacre-like materials can be obtained by controlling the freezing of ceramic slurries followed by subsequent ice sublimation and sintering, leading to multilay-ered porous ceramic structures with homogeneous and well-defined architecture, which can be subsequently filled with a selected second phase to obtain dense, complex composites.