Chapter 11. Bio-Inspired Construction of Silica Surface Patterns

  1. Prof. Dr. Edmund Bäuerlein
  1. Olaf Helmecke,
  2. Peter Behrens and
  3. Henning Menzel

Published Online: 20 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9783527619443.ch35

Handbook of Biomineralization: Biological Aspects and Structure Formation

Handbook of Biomineralization: Biological Aspects and Structure Formation

How to Cite

Helmecke, O., Behrens, P. and Menzel, H. (2007) Bio-Inspired Construction of Silica Surface Patterns, in Handbook of Biomineralization: Biological Aspects and Structure Formation (ed E. Bäuerlein), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527619443.ch35

Editor Information

  1. Max-Planck-Institute for Biochemistry, Department of Membrane Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz 18 A, 82152 Planegg, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 20 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 25 MAY 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527316410

Online ISBN: 9783527619443

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Keywords:

  • surface patterning;
  • photochemical grafting;
  • polyamines;
  • silica condensation

Summary

The organic macromolecules isolated from diatom shells are able to influence silica condensation in vitro. It has been shown that aggregation and phase separation of these macromolecules are important, and different models have been suggested to explain the structure formation process leading to the highly organized diatom shells. Among these models, phase separation — which involves the formation of silica at the membrane of the silica deposition vesicle — is of particular interest and has prompted experiments with patterned surfaces. Some examples of the preparation of surfaces with well-defined delineated organically modified areas are presented in this chapter. The deposition of silica on these surfaces results in interesting silica surface arrays (pillars or lenses). However, in some experiments, which more closely mimic the natural system, silica structures are formed which resemble some of the features occurring in diatom shells. The structure formation in these model systems can be explained taking into account phase separation, silica sol formation, droplet formation, and wetting and drying phenomena.