Chapter 18. Biomimetic Biopolymer/Silica Capsules for Biomedical Applications

  1. Prof. Dr. Edmund Bäuerlein
  1. Michel Boissière,
  2. Joachim Allouche and
  3. Thibaud Coradin

Published Online: 20 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9783527619443.ch42

Handbook of Biomineralization: Biological Aspects and Structure Formation

Handbook of Biomineralization: Biological Aspects and Structure Formation

How to Cite

Boissière, M., Allouche, J. and Coradin, T. (2007) Biomimetic Biopolymer/Silica Capsules for Biomedical Applications, in Handbook of Biomineralization: Biological Aspects and Structure Formation (ed E. Bäuerlein), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527619443.ch42

Editor Information

  1. Max-Planck-Institute for Biochemistry, Department of Membrane Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz 18 A, 82152 Planegg, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 20 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 25 MAY 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527316410

Online ISBN: 9783527619443

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Keywords:

  • silica;
  • biopolymer;
  • hybrid materials;
  • biomimetism;
  • core/shell particles;
  • encapsulation;
  • drug release systems;
  • alginate;
  • gelatin

Summary

Several living organisms build up silica shells as protections against their environment. Following a biomimetic approach, biopolymer/silica hybrid macro-, micro- and nanocapsules were designed and their potential application for encapsulation and drug release systems evaluated. In the case of alginate, silica deposition involves a first coating of poly-l-lysine and leads to dense stable membranes. In contrast, gelatin capsules interact directly with silicates to form core/shell particles with particulate surfaces. In both cases, the presence of the silica coating enhances the mechanical and/or thermal stability of the materials. Moreover, cellular uptake experiments indicate that these hybrid particles can be internalized without inducing cell death, a first indication of their biocompatibility. The possible extension of this approach to a wide range of synthetic and biological macro-molecules can be envisioned, suggesting that such a biomimetic approach is a promising route for the design of bio-functional hybrid nanomaterials.