Chapter 6. Biomimetic Bone Substitution Materials

  1. Prof. Dr. Edmund Bäuerlein
  1. Matthias Epple

Published Online: 20 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9783527619443.ch50

Handbook of Biomineralization: Biological Aspects and Structure Formation

Handbook of Biomineralization: Biological Aspects and Structure Formation

How to Cite

Epple, M. (2007) Biomimetic Bone Substitution Materials, in Handbook of Biomineralization: Biological Aspects and Structure Formation (ed E. Bäuerlein), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527619443.ch50

Editor Information

  1. Max-Planck-Institute for Biochemistry, Department of Membrane Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz 18 A, 82152 Planegg, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 20 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 25 MAY 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527316410

Online ISBN: 9783527619443

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • surgery;
  • bone;
  • calcium phosphate;
  • polymers;
  • metals;
  • osteoblasts;
  • implants

Summary

Bone defects are filled with different materials, with the patient's own bone (e.g., harvested from the iliac crest) being the “gold standard” in surgery. However, the insufficient supply of this autologous bone in the case of major defects, and the need for a second operation to harvest this bone, have triggered research into semi- or fully synthetic bone substitution materials. In general, it is desirable that a bone defect is filled by newly grown bone after some time; that is, the implant material should be biodegradable and permit or (even better) stimulate the ingrowth of bone. Thus, the regeneration depends on the body's own restorative capability, and it may be assumed that a material which has properties close to natural bone will be advantageous. Within the current concepts for bone substitution materials, the role of biomimetic - that is, “bone-resembling” - implants is highlighted.