Chapter 7. Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) as a Standard Tool to Test the Bioactivity of Implants

  1. Prof. Dr. Edmund Bäuerlein
  1. Tadashi Kokubo and
  2. Hiroaki Takadama

Published Online: 20 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9783527619443.ch51

Handbook of Biomineralization: Biological Aspects and Structure Formation

Handbook of Biomineralization: Biological Aspects and Structure Formation

How to Cite

Kokubo, T. and Takadama, H. (2008) Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) as a Standard Tool to Test the Bioactivity of Implants, in Handbook of Biomineralization: Biological Aspects and Structure Formation (ed E. Bäuerlein), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527619443.ch51

Editor Information

  1. Max-Planck-Institute for Biochemistry, Department of Membrane Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz 18 A, 82152 Planegg, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 20 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 25 MAY 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527316410

Online ISBN: 9783527619443

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Keywords:

  • simulated body fluid (SBF);
  • bioactive material;
  • apatite-forming ability;
  • bone-bonding ability;
  • bone substitute;
  • bone-like apatite

Summary

Most bone-bonding bioactive materials form bone-like apatite on their surfaces after being implanted into the living body, and bond to neighboring bone through this apatite layer. The apatite layer can be reproduced on the surfaces of materials in an organic-substance-free acellular simulated body fluid (SBF) with ion concentrations almost equal to those of human blood plasma. The bone-bonding ability of a material is often evaluated by examining the ability of apatite to form on the material in SBF. In this chapter, the validity of this method for evaluating the bone-bonding bioactivity of a material, the ion concentrations of SBF, the materials able to form apatite, the characteristics of apatite, the bone-bonding mechanisms of bioactive materials, and the mechanisms of apatite formation, are reviewed.