Chapter 8. Magnetic Microstructure of Magnetotactic Bacteria

  1. Prof. Dr. Edmund Bäuerlein
  1. Richard B. Frankel,
  2. Rafal E. Dunin-Borkowski,
  3. Mihály Pósfai and
  4. Dennis A. Bazylinski

Published Online: 20 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9783527619443.ch8

Handbook of Biomineralization: Biological Aspects and Structure Formation

Handbook of Biomineralization: Biological Aspects and Structure Formation

How to Cite

Frankel, R. B., Dunin-Borkowski, R. E., Pósfai, M. and Bazylinski, D. A. (2007) Magnetic Microstructure of Magnetotactic Bacteria, in Handbook of Biomineralization: Biological Aspects and Structure Formation (ed E. Bäuerlein), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527619443.ch8

Editor Information

  1. Max-Planck-Institute for Biochemistry, Department of Membrane Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz 18 A, 82152 Planegg, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 20 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 25 MAY 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527316410

Online ISBN: 9783527619443

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Keywords:

  • magnetotactic bacteria;
  • magnetosome;
  • magnetite;
  • greigite;
  • off-axis electron holography;
  • magnetic microstructure

Summary

Magnetotactic bacteria are permanent magnetic dipoles due to magnetosomes, which are intracytoplasmic, nanometer-sized, crystals of magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) in membrane vesicles. Different strains of bacteria have different crystal sizes, shapes, and arrangements. Here, we review the use of off-axis electron holography to determine the magnetic microstructure associated with the magnetosome crystals in a number of different magnetotactic bacteria. The results allow the quantitative determination of parameters such as magnetic moments and coercive fields for individual magnetosomes and entire magnetosome chains.