Chapter 113. The Fine Art of Molding: Flexible Molds of RTV-2 Silicone Rubber

  1. Prof. Norbert Auner2 and
  2. Prof. Johann Weis3
  1. Georg Kollmann

Published Online: 28 APR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9783527619917.ch113

Organosilicon Chemistry IV: From Molecules to Materials

Organosilicon Chemistry IV: From Molecules to Materials

How to Cite

Kollmann, G. (2000) The Fine Art of Molding: Flexible Molds of RTV-2 Silicone Rubber, in Organosilicon Chemistry IV: From Molecules to Materials (eds N. Auner and J. Weis), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527619917.ch113

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Inst. für Anorganische Chemie, der Universität Frankfurt, Marie-Curie-Strasse 11, D-60439 Frankfurt am Main, Germany, Phone: 0 69/7 98-29180, -29591, Fax: 069/798-29188

  2. 3

    Wacker-Chemie GmbH, Geschäftsbereich S, Werk Burghausen, Johannes-Hess-Strasse 24, D-84489 Burghausen, Germany

Author Information

  1. Business Unit Elastomers / Business Team Technical Specialities Wacker-Chemie GmbH, D-84480 Burghausen, Germany Tel.: Int. code + (8677)83 3436 —Fax: Int. code + (8677)83 5735

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 APR 2008
  2. Published Print: 17 JAN 2000

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527298549

Online ISBN: 9783527619917

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Keywords:

  • RTV-2;
  • silicone rubber;
  • molding;
  • mold making;
  • negative molds;
  • copies;
  • reproduction materials

Summary

Invented in the 1950s, room-temperature-vulcanizing two-component (RTV-2) silicone rubbers have found many different applications since. One of the most important is their use as a material for making flexible negative molds, which are perfectly suitable to obtain faithful copies of even intricate models out of the common reproduction materials. Due to their easy processing, high elasticity, short-term resistance to temperatures up to 350°C, excellent release properties and, last but not least, only minor physiological and environmental effects in comparison with other flexible mold materials, RTV-2 silicone rubbers have established themselves worldwide as the top material for making flexible negative molds. This paper will first focus on the chemistry and special features of RTV-2 silicone rubber, and then offer a closer look at molding techniques and applications.