Chapter 117. Fumed Silica — Rheological Additive for Adhesives, Resins, and Paints

  1. Prof. Dr. Norbert Auner4 and
  2. Prof. Dr. Johann Weis5
  1. Herbert Barthel1,
  2. Michael Dreyer1,
  3. Torsten Gottschalk-Gaudig1,
  4. Victor Litvinov2 and
  5. Ekaterina Nikitina3

Published Online: 5 MAY 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9783527619924.ch117

Organosilicon Chemistry V: From Molecules to Materials

Organosilicon Chemistry V: From Molecules to Materials

How to Cite

Barthel, H., Dreyer, M., Gottschalk-Gaudig, T., Litvinov, V. and Nikitina, E. (2003) Fumed Silica — Rheological Additive for Adhesives, Resins, and Paints, in Organosilicon Chemistry V: From Molecules to Materials (eds N. Auner and J. Weis), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527619924.ch117

Editor Information

  1. 4

    Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Frankfurt, Marie-Curie-Straße 11, 60439 Frankfurt am Main, Germany

  2. 5

    Consortium of Electrochemical Industry GmbH, Zielstattstraße 20, 81379 Munich, Germany

Author Information

  1. 1

    Wacker-Chemie GmbH, D-84480 Burghausen, Germany

  2. 2

    DSM Research, NL-6160 MD Geleen, The Netherlands

  3. 3

    Institute of Applied Mechanics, RAS, Moscow, Russia

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 5 MAY 2008
  2. Published Print: 26 SEP 2003

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527306701

Online ISBN: 9783527619924

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Keywords:

  • fumed silica;
  • unsaturated polyester resins;
  • vinyl ester resins;
  • intermolecular interactions;
  • rheology

Summary

Fumed silica, a synthetic silicon dioxide, is a powerful rheological additive for resins and paints to introduce thixotropy or even a yield point. The rheological effectiveness of fumed silica is based on its ability to form percolating networks which immobilize large volumes of liquid. By a combination of advanced rheological experiments, spectroscopic investigations, and quantum chemical calculations it could be demonstrated that the formation and stability of the silica network is strongly influenced by particle-resin interactions. The results can be used to develop comprehensive models, which explain the rheological performance of different grades of fumed silica in different resins.