Chapter 92. Hybrid Coatings Based on Silanes: Precursor Methods to Make Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Coatings

  1. Prof. Dr. Norbert Auner2 and
  2. Prof. Dr. Johann Weis3
  1. B. Borup,
  2. R. Edelmann and
  3. J. Monkiewicz

Published Online: 5 MAY 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9783527619924.ch92

Organosilicon Chemistry V: From Molecules to Materials

Organosilicon Chemistry V: From Molecules to Materials

How to Cite

Borup, B., Edelmann, R. and Monkiewicz, J. (2003) Hybrid Coatings Based on Silanes: Precursor Methods to Make Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Coatings, in Organosilicon Chemistry V: From Molecules to Materials (eds N. Auner and J. Weis), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527619924.ch92

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Frankfurt, Marie-Curie-Straße 11, 60439 Frankfurt am Main, Germany

  2. 3

    Consortium of Electrochemical Industry GmbH, Zielstattstraße 20, 81379 Munich, Germany

Author Information

  1. Degussa AG, D-79618 Rheinfelden, Germany Tel: +49 7623 91 8131 —Fax: +49 723 91 8130

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 5 MAY 2008
  2. Published Print: 26 SEP 2003

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527306701

Online ISBN: 9783527619924

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Keywords:

  • hybrid coatings;
  • sol-gel process;
  • inorganic nanoparticles;
  • organic matrix;
  • organofunctional silane

Summary

Alkoxysilanes hydrolyze and condense with the addition of water. This simple fact has been known for over 150 years. Only much more recently was the chemistry of this reaction elucidated. Initial condensation and hydrolysis lead to sol formation, which, upon further hydrolysis and condensation, yields a gel. This technology is now known as the sol-gel process. Coatings based in part on a sol-gel core involving inorganic particles and alkyl- or organofunctional trialkoxysilanes embedded in an organic matrix, so-called hybrid systems or interpenetrating networks, are described. The properties of these systems are in many ways superior to those of traditional organic-based coatings. Improvements in performance include the mechanical durability (scratch and abrasion resistance), chemical durability, UV stability, and environmental aspects, and the range of applications possible with these materials has increased, in part due to the range of inorganic/organic compositions possible. A new version of the sol-gel process is the reaction of alkyl- and organofunctional trialkoxysilanes with inorganic nanoparticles surrounded by the organic matrix, the so-called in-situ sol-gel process. The chemistry involved in this process is discussed as well as applications resulting from the superior properties of the resulting products.