Chapter 4. Organ Dysfunctions during Severe Sepsis and Septic-Like Syndromes: Epidemiology, Classification, and Mechanisms

  1. Prof. Dr. Jean-Marc Cavaillon2 and
  2. Dr. Christophe Adrie3
  1. Olfa Hamzaoui and
  2. Jean Carlet

Published Online: 25 MAY 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9783527626151.ch4

Sepsis and Non-Infectious Systemic Inflammation: From Biology to Critical Care

Sepsis and Non-Infectious Systemic Inflammation: From Biology to Critical Care

How to Cite

Hamzaoui, O. and Carlet, J. (2008) Organ Dysfunctions during Severe Sepsis and Septic-Like Syndromes: Epidemiology, Classification, and Mechanisms, in Sepsis and Non-Infectious Systemic Inflammation: From Biology to Critical Care (eds J.-M. Cavaillon and C. Adrie), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527626151.ch4

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Unit Cytokines et Inflammation, Institut Pasteur, 28, rue Dr. Roux, 75015 Paris, France

  2. 3

    Hôpital Delafontaine, Réanimation Polyvalente, 2 rue du Docteur Delafontaine, 93205 Saint-Denis, France

Author Information

  1. Groupe Hospitalier Paris Saint-Joseph, Intensive Care Unit, Paris, France

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 25 MAY 2009
  2. Published Print: 15 OCT 2008

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527319350

Online ISBN: 9783527626151

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Keywords:

  • the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS);
  • organ dysfunction;
  • sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA);
  • multiple organ failure (MOF);
  • microvascular dysfunction;
  • coagulopathy;
  • endothelial activation;
  • inflammatory cytokines

Summary

Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), also often known as multiple organ failure (MOF) is the clinical manifestation of the tissue injury affecting various organs, whatever the mechanism, infectious or not, during very severe insults in particularly severe shock states. The objective of this chapter is to review the definition, epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical aspects of MODS/MOF in septic patients as well as non-infectious Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) patients.