Chapter 23. Familial Leukemias

  1. Prof. Dr. Heike Allgayer PhD1,
  2. Prof. Dr. Helga Rehder2 and
  3. Prof. Dr. Simone Fulda3
  1. Christa Fonatsch

Published Online: 21 AUG 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9783527627523.ch23

Hereditary Tumors: From Genes to Clinical Consequences

Hereditary Tumors: From Genes to Clinical Consequences

How to Cite

Fonatsch, C. (2008) Familial Leukemias, in Hereditary Tumors: From Genes to Clinical Consequences (eds H. Allgayer, H. Rehder and S. Fulda), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527627523.ch23

Editor Information

  1. 1

    University of Heidelberg and DKFZ (German Cancer Research Center) Heidelberg, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Chair of Experimental Surgery, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1–3, 68167 Mannheim, Germany

  2. 2

    Medical University Vienna, Department of Medical Genetics, Währinger Strasse 10, 1090 Wien, Austria

  3. 3

    Ulm University Children's Hospital, Eythstrasse 24, 89075 Ulm, Germany

Author Information

  1. Medical University Vienna, Department of Medical Genetics, Währinger Strasse 10, 1090 Wien, Austria

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 AUG 2009
  2. Published Print: 17 DEC 2008

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527320288

Online ISBN: 9783527627523

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Keywords:

  • tumor predisposition syndromes;
  • constitutional chromosome anomalies;
  • constitutional gene mutations;
  • gene polymorphisms;
  • micro RNAs

Summary

Leukemias and other hematological neoplasias are frequently observed in association with different genetic disorders, as DNA repair deficiency syndromes, tumor predisposition syndromes, immunodeficiency syndromes, cancer family syndromes, and bone marrow failure syndromes, as well as in connection with several constitutional chromosome anomalies. Recently, in families with increased leukemia incidence, constitutional mutations have been identified in genes that are also affected by somatic mutations in sporadic leukemias. In addition to these high penetrance mutations, gene alterations with a low penetrance and polymorphisms seem to predispose to leukemia and/or modify the clinical course of the leukemia. Predisposing and modifying polymorphisms can be found in genes involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, DNA repair, detoxification, and so on. A novel class of small RNA molecules, the so-called microRNAs, also play a role in cancer and presumably in leukemia pathogenesis. The findings on constitutional genetic alterations predisposing to leukemia start to close the gap between inborn and acquired genetic diseases.