Chapter 26. Hereditary Tumors in Children

  1. Prof. Dr. Heike Allgayer PhD1,
  2. Prof. Dr. Helga Rehder2 and
  3. Prof. Dr. Simone Fulda3
  1. Prof. Dr. Simone Fulda

Published Online: 21 AUG 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9783527627523.ch26

Hereditary Tumors: From Genes to Clinical Consequences

Hereditary Tumors: From Genes to Clinical Consequences

How to Cite

Fulda, S. (2008) Hereditary Tumors in Children, in Hereditary Tumors: From Genes to Clinical Consequences (eds H. Allgayer, H. Rehder and S. Fulda), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527627523.ch26

Editor Information

  1. 1

    University of Heidelberg and DKFZ (German Cancer Research Center) Heidelberg, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Chair of Experimental Surgery, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1–3, 68167 Mannheim, Germany

  2. 2

    Medical University Vienna, Department of Medical Genetics, Währinger Strasse 10, 1090 Wien, Austria

  3. 3

    Ulm University Children's Hospital, Eythstrasse 24, 89075 Ulm, Germany

Author Information

  1. Ulm University Children's Hospital, Eythstrasse 24, 89075 Ulm, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 AUG 2009
  2. Published Print: 17 DEC 2008

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527320288

Online ISBN: 9783527627523

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Keywords:

  • pediatric tumors;
  • childhood cancer;
  • genetic cancer predisposition in children;
  • familial neoplastic syndromes in childhood

Summary

Cancer predisposition syndromes during infancy are rare and only 1–10% of childhood malignancies are caused by hereditary factors. A variety of familial and genetic syndromes is associated with an increased risk of cancer during childhood. Known hereditary syndromes account for almost all the excess risk of cancer among first-degree relatives of children with cancer. The genetic basis of cancer predisposition provides many opportunities for the management of patients and their families.