Chapter 1.1. Coupling Chemistries for the Modification and Functionalization of Surfaces to Create Advanced Biointerfaces

  1. Dr. Renate Förch1,
  2. Prof. Dr. Holger Schönherr2 and
  3. Dr. A. Tobias A. Jenkins3
  1. Prof. Dr. Holger Schönherr

Published Online: 9 SEP 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9783527628599.ch1

Surface Design: Applications in Bioscience and Nanotechnology

Surface Design: Applications in Bioscience and Nanotechnology

How to Cite

Schönherr, H. (2009) Coupling Chemistries for the Modification and Functionalization of Surfaces to Create Advanced Biointerfaces, in Surface Design: Applications in Bioscience and Nanotechnology (eds R. Förch, H. Schönherr and A. T. A. Jenkins), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527628599.ch1

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Max-Planck-Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz, Germany

  2. 2

    University of Siegen, Department of Physical Chemistry, Adolf-Reichwein-Straße 2, 57076 Siegen, Germany

  3. 3

    University of Bath, Department of Chemistry, Bath BA2 7AY, United Kingdom

Author Information

  1. University of Siegen, Department of Physical Chemistry, Adolf-Reichwein-Straße 2, 57076 Siegen, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 9 SEP 2009
  2. Published Print: 12 JUN 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527407897

Online ISBN: 9783527628599

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Keywords:

  • surface design;
  • coupling chemistries;
  • modification of surfaces;
  • functionalization of surfaces;
  • advanced biointerfaces;
  • self-assembled monolayers;
  • attachment reactions

Summary

Surface design for biomaterial and life-science applications comprises a highly interdisciplinary and rapidly evolving field, in which many exciting developments are currently taking place. Concomitant with these developments are new and previously unthinkable opportunities in biointerfacing and 2D and 3D design of materials. In this context, but also in the context of bioscience and nanotechnology, surface chemistry is omnipresent and plays a crucially important role. In applications ranging from tailor-made nanoparticles and organized molecular assemblies to substrate supported biointerfaces in sensors and protective coatings in implants, surface design and engineering are indispensable. In this tutorial review chapter fundamental coupling chemistries utilized for the modification and functionalization of surfaces to fabricate advanced biointerfaces will be treated with a particular focus on the peculiarities encountered in the corresponding surface chemical reactions. Thereby, the ground is laid for the new approaches and studies discussed in detail in the subsequent chapters.