Chapter 3.2. Modification of Surfaces by Photosensitive Silanes

  1. Dr. Renate Förch2,
  2. Prof. Dr. Holger Schönherr3 and
  3. Dr. A. Tobias A. Jenkins4
  1. Xiaosong Li2,
  2. Swapna Pradhan-Kadam2,
  3. Marta álvarez1 and
  4. Ulrich Jonas1

Published Online: 9 SEP 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9783527628599.ch10

Surface Design: Applications in Bioscience and Nanotechnology

Surface Design: Applications in Bioscience and Nanotechnology

How to Cite

Li, X., Pradhan-Kadam, S., álvarez, M. and Jonas, U. (2009) Modification of Surfaces by Photosensitive Silanes, in Surface Design: Applications in Bioscience and Nanotechnology (eds R. Förch, H. Schönherr and A. T. A. Jenkins), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527628599.ch10

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Max-Planck-Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz, Germany

  2. 3

    University of Siegen, Department of Physical Chemistry, Adolf-Reichwein-Straße 2, 57076 Siegen, Germany

  3. 4

    University of Bath, Department of Chemistry, Bath BA2 7AY, United Kingdom

Author Information

  1. 1

    FORTH / IESL, Voutes Str., P.O. Box 1527, 71110 Heraklion, Greece

  2. 2

    Max-Planck-Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 9 SEP 2009
  2. Published Print: 12 JUN 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527407897

Online ISBN: 9783527628599

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Keywords:

  • surface modification;
  • photosensitive silanes;
  • patterned functional surfaces;
  • photodeprotection;
  • patterning self-assembled monolayers;
  • photolithography

Summary

Based on the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) technique, the site-selective adsorption of molecules and mesoscopic objects at predefined positions on solid surfaces is a key fabrication step and a major challenge in many applications. The adsorption process is strongly influenced by the functional groups on the surfaces, which can be introduced by different strategies for depositing SAMs. In order to direct the adsorption process to predefined regions of the substrate, chemical patterning of these surface layers with discrete micro- to nanometer features is required. Such functional patterning is usually carried out with photolithography and microcontact printing.

Silane chemistry using alkyltriethoxysilanes with photoprotection groups provides attractive possibilities for simplifying the preparation of chemically patterned surfaces. A major advantage of this method lies in the highly defined surface functionalities and full control over the layer-preparation process. Lateral patterning can be achieved easily by direct irradiation and deprotection of the silane layer through a mask, as performed in standard photolithography. This chapter provides an overview of such photoprotected silanes and the corresponding surface layers (silane SAMs), as well as techniques for patterning these SAMs on silica substrates.