Chapter 3.6. Plasma-Polymerized Allylamine Thin Films for DNA Sensing

  1. Dr. Renate Förch1,
  2. Prof. Dr. Holger Schönherr2 and
  3. Dr. A. Tobias A. Jenkins3
  1. Li-Qiang Chu,
  2. Wolfgang Knoll and
  3. Dr. Renate Förch

Published Online: 9 SEP 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9783527628599.ch14

Surface Design: Applications in Bioscience and Nanotechnology

Surface Design: Applications in Bioscience and Nanotechnology

How to Cite

Chu, L.-Q., Knoll, W. and Förch, R. (2009) Plasma-Polymerized Allylamine Thin Films for DNA Sensing, in Surface Design: Applications in Bioscience and Nanotechnology (eds R. Förch, H. Schönherr and A. T. A. Jenkins), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527628599.ch14

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Max-Planck-Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz, Germany

  2. 2

    University of Siegen, Department of Physical Chemistry, Adolf-Reichwein-Straße 2, 57076 Siegen, Germany

  3. 3

    University of Bath, Department of Chemistry, Bath BA2 7AY, United Kingdom

Author Information

  1. Max-Planck-Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 9 SEP 2009
  2. Published Print: 12 JUN 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527407897

Online ISBN: 9783527628599

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Keywords:

  • plasma-polymerized allylamine thin films;
  • DNA sensing;
  • plasma deposition;
  • ppAA films;
  • SPR measurements;
  • OWS measurements;
  • SPFS measurements

Summary

Plasma polymerization of allylamine (ppAA) has proved to be an efficient approach to generate a positively charged surface, and has been employed for the immobilization of negatively charged DNA. In this work, the stability of ppAA coatings was investigated by measuring their thickness change using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy and optical waveguide spectroscopy (OWS). The presence of amine groups in the deposited ppAA films was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Furthermore, the ppAA coatings were employed in a new DNA-detection concept, in which the hybridization of target DNA with fluorescently labeled PNA leads to a measurable emission as measured by surface plasmon enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS). The fluorescently labeled PNA becomes negatively charged after binding to the complementary target DNA, and hence can adsorb onto positively charged ppAA surfaces. The DNA-detection method would be particularly suitable for detection of a specific gene in GMO, viral, and pathogen DNA, without the need for labeling the target DNA.