Chapter 4.5. Nanoporous Thin Films as Highly Versatile and Sensitive Waveguide Biosensors

  1. Dr. Renate Förch1,
  2. Prof. Dr. Holger Schönherr2 and
  3. Dr. A. Tobias A. Jenkins3
  1. K.H. Aaron Lau1,
  2. Petra Cameron3,
  3. Hatice Duran1,
  4. Ahmed I. Abou-Kandil1 and
  5. Wolfgang Knoll1

Published Online: 9 SEP 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9783527628599.ch19

Surface Design: Applications in Bioscience and Nanotechnology

Surface Design: Applications in Bioscience and Nanotechnology

How to Cite

Lau, K.H. A., Cameron, P., Duran, H., Abou-Kandil, A. I. and Knoll, W. (2009) Nanoporous Thin Films as Highly Versatile and Sensitive Waveguide Biosensors, in Surface Design: Applications in Bioscience and Nanotechnology (eds R. Förch, H. Schönherr and A. T. A. Jenkins), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527628599.ch19

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Max-Planck-Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz, Germany

  2. 2

    University of Siegen, Department of Physical Chemistry, Adolf-Reichwein-Straße 2, 57076 Siegen, Germany

  3. 3

    University of Bath, Department of Chemistry, Bath BA2 7AY, United Kingdom

Author Information

  1. 1

    Max-Planck-Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz, Germany

  2. 3

    University of Bath, Department of Chemistry, Bath BA2 7AY, United Kingdom

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 9 SEP 2009
  2. Published Print: 12 JUN 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527407897

Online ISBN: 9783527628599

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Keywords:

  • nanoporous thin films;
  • waveguide biosensors;
  • nanoporous oxide thin-film waveguides;
  • nanoporous AAO;
  • optical waveguide spectroscopy (OWS);
  • effective medium theory (EMT)

Summary

This chapter introduces the application of nanoporous oxide thin films as optical waveguides for high-sensitivity biosensing. We discuss the waveguiding properties of nanoporous oxide thin films in the visible wavelengths when pore dimensions are much smaller (<1/10) than the guided light, and we show that the refractive index of such a nanopore-oxide matrix composite film is very well described by effective medium theory (EMT). Moreover, the optical response arising from binding of an analyte to a (suitably functionalized) nanoporous thin film is also described by EMT and forms the basis of analysis for high-sensitivity biosensing. Recent results on probing the sensitivity limits of label-free detection and the characterization of different molecular architectures are also presented. Particular attention is paid to the ability to differentiate, in situ, processes that occur on pore surfaces from those occurring on the top surface of the film. Moreover, we were able to directly measure the permeation of proteins within a nanoporous structure by simultaneous in-situ waveguide and electrochemical measurements.