Chapter 5.2. Quantitative Lateral Force Microscopy

  1. Dr. Renate Förch3,
  2. Prof. Dr. Holger Schönherr4 and
  3. Dr. A. Tobias A. Jenkins5
  1. Prof. Dr. Holger Schönherr4,
  2. Ewa Tocha1,
  3. Jing Song2 and
  4. G. Julius Vancso2

Published Online: 9 SEP 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9783527628599.ch21

Surface Design: Applications in Bioscience and Nanotechnology

Surface Design: Applications in Bioscience and Nanotechnology

How to Cite

Schönherr, H., Tocha, E., Song, J. and Vancso, G. J. (2009) Quantitative Lateral Force Microscopy, in Surface Design: Applications in Bioscience and Nanotechnology (eds R. Förch, H. Schönherr and A. T. A. Jenkins), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527628599.ch21

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Max-Planck-Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz, Germany

  2. 4

    University of Siegen, Department of Physical Chemistry, Adolf-Reichwein-Straße 2, 57076 Siegen, Germany

  3. 5

    University of Bath, Department of Chemistry, Bath BA2 7AY, United Kingdom

Author Information

  1. 1

    Dow Olefinverbund GmbH, P.O. Box 1163, 06258 Schkopau, Germany

  2. 2

    University of Twente, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, Department of Materials Science and Technology of Polymers, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands

  3. 4

    University of Siegen, Department of Physical Chemistry, Adolf-Reichwein-Straße 2, 57076 Siegen, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 9 SEP 2009
  2. Published Print: 12 JUN 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527407897

Online ISBN: 9783527628599

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • quantitative lateral force microscopy;
  • surface analysis;
  • interface analysis

Summary

Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based friction force measurements possess significant relevance both for research on the origin and fundamentals of friction on the single and few asperity level, as well as for applied research aiming at compositional mapping of heterogeneous surfaces and patterns. One shortcoming that has limited thus far the widespread applicability of lateral force microscopy (LFM) in quantitative routine measurements has been the lack of a suitable calibration procedure. In this chapter we provide a concise introduction to LFM and elucidate the principle of the recently introduced and refined improved wedge calibration method on a universal calibration specimen. In addition, the correct calibration of LFM for measurements in liquid media is discussed. Finally, representative data obtained in our laboratory and recent data published in the literature are placed into perspective to illustrate the potential future development of LFM as important quantitative tool in the context of surface analysis required for designed nanostructured biomaterials in particular for life-science applications.