Chapter 1.4. Tutorial Review: Modern Biological Sensors

  1. Dr. Renate Förch1,
  2. Prof. Dr. Holger Schönherr2 and
  3. Dr. A. Tobias A. Jenkins3
  1. Dr. A. Tobias A. Jenkins

Published Online: 9 SEP 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9783527628599.ch4

Surface Design: Applications in Bioscience and Nanotechnology

Surface Design: Applications in Bioscience and Nanotechnology

How to Cite

Jenkins, A. T. A. (2009) Tutorial Review: Modern Biological Sensors, in Surface Design: Applications in Bioscience and Nanotechnology (eds R. Förch, H. Schönherr and A. T. A. Jenkins), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527628599.ch4

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Max-Planck-Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz, Germany

  2. 2

    University of Siegen, Department of Physical Chemistry, Adolf-Reichwein-Straße 2, 57076 Siegen, Germany

  3. 3

    University of Bath, Department of Chemistry, Bath BA2 7AY, United Kingdom

Author Information

  1. University of Bath, Department of Chemistry, Bath BA2 7AY, United Kingdom

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 9 SEP 2009
  2. Published Print: 12 JUN 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527407897

Online ISBN: 9783527628599

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Keywords:

  • biological sensors;
  • analytical concepts;
  • biosensor design;
  • signal amplification;
  • assay design;
  • attachment of functional biomolecules;
  • prevention of nonspecific adsorption

Summary

One of the most important applications of advanced, functional surfaces is in the design and construction of biological sensors. A sensor can be defined as a system that recognizes an analyte, transduces that recognition signal and gives an output. The output might be a simple color change, as in the case of human chorionic gonadotrophin sensors that detect pregnancy) or a quantitative measure, such as the blood-glucose sensor. Surface architecture can play a crucial role in sensor performance, affecting a sensor's sensitivity, analyte selectivity and mode of action. This chapter will give an overview of key aspects of sensor technology and introduce the reader to the analytical considerations that must be considered when designing sensor systems. This review will focus on the sensors that detect biologically important analytes, so-called biosensors. Specific consideration will be given to sensors for: bacteria, proteins / enzymes, sugars, nucleic acids and fatty acids. One chapter can not claim to give an exhaustive review of a huge subject, but it is our aim to give the reader a feeling for the general area, with particular focus on how advanced surfaces can facilitate sensor performance.