Chapter 2.4. Structured and Functionalized Polymer Thin-Film Architectures

  1. Dr. Renate Förch3,
  2. Prof. Dr. Holger Schönherr4 and
  3. Dr. A. Tobias A. Jenkins5
  1. Prof. Dr. Holger Schönherr4,
  2. Chuan Liang Feng1,
  3. Anika Embrechts2 and
  4. G. Julius Vancso2

Published Online: 9 SEP 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9783527628599.ch8

Surface Design: Applications in Bioscience and Nanotechnology

Surface Design: Applications in Bioscience and Nanotechnology

How to Cite

Schönherr, H., Feng, C. L., Embrechts, A. and Vancso, G. J. (2009) Structured and Functionalized Polymer Thin-Film Architectures, in Surface Design: Applications in Bioscience and Nanotechnology (eds R. Förch, H. Schönherr and A. T. A. Jenkins), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527628599.ch8

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Max-Planck-Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz, Germany

  2. 4

    University of Siegen, Department of Physical Chemistry, Adolf-Reichwein-Straße 2, 57076 Siegen, Germany

  3. 5

    University of Bath, Department of Chemistry, Bath BA2 7AY, United Kingdom

Author Information

  1. 1

    BioMaDe Institute, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen, The Netherlands

  2. 2

    University of Twente, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands

  3. 4

    University of Siegen, Department of Physical Chemistry, Adolf-Reichwein-Straße 2, 57076 Siegen, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 9 SEP 2009
  2. Published Print: 12 JUN 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527407897

Online ISBN: 9783527628599

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Keywords:

  • functionalized polymer thin-film architectures

Summary

Thin films of functional polymers play an important role for the fabrication of versatile patterned and structured architectures and platforms in the areas of biosensing and cell-surface interaction analyses. In this chapter, the recent progress in the laboratories of the authors in this area is summarized and provides a basis for the subsequent Chapter 3.4 on cancer cell-surface interactions. Through the combination of functional polymers, solution phase surface chemistry, robust covalent attachment, new soft lithography and imprinting approaches, unique structured surfaces and specimens can be obtained that encompass the important determinants for biosensing and cell response. Surface chemical functionality and topographic structures can be simultaneously, as well as independently, altered at will over a broad range of length scales ranging from individual and groups of cells on the tens of micrometer level down to macromolecular length scales. Thereby, a toolbox for interface and surface engineering is developed.