Chapter 1. Introduction to Green Chemistry, Organic Synthesis and Pharmaceuticals

  1. Dr. Peter J. Dunn2,3,
  2. Dr. Andrew S. Wells4 and
  3. Dr. Michael T. Williams5
  1. Roger Sheldon

Published Online: 19 MAR 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9783527629688.ch1

Green Chemistry in the Pharmaceutical Industry

Green Chemistry in the Pharmaceutical Industry

How to Cite

Sheldon, R. (2010) Introduction to Green Chemistry, Organic Synthesis and Pharmaceuticals, in Green Chemistry in the Pharmaceutical Industry (eds P. J. Dunn, A. S. Wells and M. T. Williams), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527629688.ch1

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Pfizer Green Chemistry Lead, Ramsgate Road, Sandwich, Kent, CT13 9NJ, United Kingdom

  2. 3

    Pfizer Global Research and Development, Ramsgate Road, Sandwich, Kent, CT13 9NJ, UK

  3. 4

    Astra Zeneca, Process Research & Development, Bakewell Road, Loughborough, LE11 5RH, United Kingdom

  4. 5

    CMC Consultant, 133, London Road, Deal, Kent, CT14 9TY, United Kingdom

Author Information

  1. Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 136, 2628 BL Delft, The Netherlands

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 MAR 2010
  2. Published Print: 10 MAR 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527324187

Online ISBN: 9783527629688

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Keywords:

  • history of organic chemistry;
  • Taxol;
  • E factor;
  • atom economy;
  • catalytic methodologies;
  • biocatalysis;
  • benign by design;
  • twelve principles;
  • solvent reduction

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • The Development of Organic Synthesis

  • The Environmental Factor

  • The Role of Catalysis

  • Green Chemistry: Benign by Design

  • Ibuprofen Manufacture

  • The Question of Solvents: Alternative Reaction Media

  • Biocatalysis: Green Chemistry Meets White Biotechnology

  • Conclusions and Prospects

  • References