27. Polyamines in Developing Stress-Resistant Crops

  1. Dr. Narendra Tuteja4,5,
  2. Dr. Sarvajeet Singh Gill4,6,
  3. Prof. Antonio F. Tiburcio7 and
  4. Dr. Renu Tuteja4
  1. Francisco Marco1,
  2. Rubén Alcázar2,
  3. Teresa Altabella7,
  4. Pedro Carrasco3,
  5. Sarvajeet Singh Gill4,6,
  6. Narendra Tuteja4,5 and
  7. Antonio F. Tiburcio7

Published Online: 30 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9783527632930.ch27

Improving Crop Resistance to Abiotic Stress, Volume 1 & Volume 2

Improving Crop Resistance to Abiotic Stress, Volume 1 & Volume 2

How to Cite

Marco, F., Alcázar, R., Altabella, T., Carrasco, P., Gill, S. S., Tuteja, N. and Tiburcio, A. F. (2012) Polyamines in Developing Stress-Resistant Crops, in Improving Crop Resistance to Abiotic Stress, Volume 1 & Volume 2 (eds N. Tuteja, S. S. Gill, A. F. Tiburcio and R. Tuteja), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527632930.ch27

Editor Information

  1. 4

    International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Plant Molecular Biology Group, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, India

  2. 5

    MD University, Centre for Biotechnology, Rohtak 124 001, Haryana, India

  3. 6

    Aligarh Muslim University, Department of Botany, Aligarh 202 002, Uttar Pradesh, India

  4. 7

    Universitat de Barcelona, Unitat de Fisiologia Vegetal, Facultat de Farmàcia, Av. Joan XXIII, S/N, 08028 Barcelona, Spain

Author Information

  1. 1

    Universitat de València, Departament de Biologia Vegetal, Facultat de Farmàcia, Av Vicent Andres Estellés s/n, 46100 Burjassot, València, Spain

  2. 2

    Max-Planck Institut für Züchtungsforschung, Carl-von-Linné-Weg 10, 50829 Köln, Germany

  3. 3

    Universitat de València, Departament de Bioquímica, i Biologia Molecular, Facultat de Ciències Biològiques, Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot, València, Spain

  4. 4

    International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Plant Molecular Biology Group, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, India

  5. 5

    MD University, Centre for Biotechnology, Rohtak 124 001, Haryana, India

  6. 6

    Aligarh Muslim University, Department of Botany, Aligarh 202 002, Uttar Pradesh, India

  7. 7

    Universitat de Barcelona, Unitat de Fisiologia Vegetal, Facultat de Farmàcia, Av. Joan XXIII, S/N, 08028 Barcelona, Spain

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 MAR 2012
  2. Published Print: 14 MAR 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527328406

Online ISBN: 9783527632930

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Keywords:

  • abiotic stresses;
  • catabolism;
  • polyamines;
  • putrescine;
  • signaling;
  • spermidine;
  • spermine;
  • stress tolerance;
  • transgenic plants

Summary

Polyamines (PAs) are small protonated compounds with key roles in plant development and physiological processes. PAs may also function as stress messengers in plant responses to different stress signals. Recent studies using exogenous application of polyamines and more contemporary genetic manipulation of polyamine levels in crops and model species point to their involvement in stress protection. The different mechanisms by which polyamines exert their functions are presently being unraveled and involve different modes of action that are summarized in this chapter. Polyamines are integrated with other stress-related hormone pathways, such as abscisic acid (ABA), reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling, nitric oxide, and regulation of ion channels that are now being elucidated. Also, polyamines are implicated in the transcriptional regulation to abiotic and biotic stresses as revealed in recent global transcriptome analyses. The genetic manipulation of polyamine levels has been proven to be an efficient tool for enhancing stress tolerance in many plant species. A number of examples and their potential application to crops for a sustainable agriculture are discussed in this chapter, along with the most recent advances in our understanding of the regulation and mode of action of polyamines.