33. Maize: Physiological and Molecular Approaches for Improving Drought Tolerance

  1. Dr. Narendra Tuteja4,5,
  2. Dr. Sarvajeet Singh Gill4,6,
  3. Prof. Antonio F. Tiburcio7 and
  4. Dr. Renu Tuteja4
  1. Ishwar Singh1,
  2. Thirunavukkarasu Nepolean2,
  3. Rajyalakshmi Ambika Rajendran1 and
  4. Mariko Shono3

Published Online: 30 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9783527632930.ch33

Improving Crop Resistance to Abiotic Stress, Volume 1 & Volume 2

Improving Crop Resistance to Abiotic Stress, Volume 1 & Volume 2

How to Cite

Singh, I., Nepolean, T., Rajendran, R. A. and Shono, M. (2012) Maize: Physiological and Molecular Approaches for Improving Drought Tolerance, in Improving Crop Resistance to Abiotic Stress, Volume 1 & Volume 2 (eds N. Tuteja, S. S. Gill, A. F. Tiburcio and R. Tuteja), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527632930.ch33

Editor Information

  1. 4

    International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Plant Molecular Biology Group, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, India

  2. 5

    MD University, Centre for Biotechnology, Rohtak 124 001, Haryana, India

  3. 6

    Aligarh Muslim University, Department of Botany, Aligarh 202 002, Uttar Pradesh, India

  4. 7

    Universitat de Barcelona, Unitat de Fisiologia Vegetal, Facultat de Farmàcia, Av. Joan XXIII, S/N, 08028 Barcelona, Spain

Author Information

  1. 1

    Indian Agricultural Research Institute, Directorate of Maize Research, New Delhi 110 012, India

  2. 2

    Indian Agricultural Research Institute, Division of Genetics, New Delhi 110 012, India

  3. 3

    Japan International Center for Agricultural Science, Tropical Agriculture Research Front, Ishigaki, Okinawa 907-0002, Japan

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 MAR 2012
  2. Published Print: 14 MAR 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527328406

Online ISBN: 9783527632930

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Keywords:

  • ABA;
  • drought tolerance;
  • functional genomics;
  • genetic engineering;
  • maize;
  • signaling

Summary

Maize is a C4 crop with a high rate of photosynthetic activity, leading to high grain and biomass yield. It is predominantly a cross-pollinating species, a feature that has contributed to its broad genetic and morphological variability and geographical adaptability. Economically, the most important types of maize are grown for grain and fodder or silage production. However, in the tropics, grain is primarily used for human consumption. FAO predicts that an additional 60 Mt of maize grain will be needed from the annual global harvest by 2030. The demand for maize as an animal feed will continue to grow faster than the demand for its use as a human food, particularly in Asia, where a doubling of production is expected from the present level of 165 Mt to almost 400 Mt in 2030.