38. Vegetable Crops: Improvement of Tolerance to Adverse Chemical Soil Conditions by Grafting

  1. Dr. Narendra Tuteja3,4,
  2. Dr. Sarvajeet Singh Gill3,5,
  3. Prof. Antonio F. Tiburcio6 and
  4. Dr. Renu Tuteja3
  1. Giuseppe Colla1,
  2. Youssef Rouphael2 and
  3. Mariateresa Cardarelli1

Published Online: 30 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9783527632930.ch38

Improving Crop Resistance to Abiotic Stress, Volume 1 & Volume 2

Improving Crop Resistance to Abiotic Stress, Volume 1 & Volume 2

How to Cite

Colla, G., Rouphael, Y. and Cardarelli, M. (2012) Vegetable Crops: Improvement of Tolerance to Adverse Chemical Soil Conditions by Grafting, in Improving Crop Resistance to Abiotic Stress, Volume 1 & Volume 2 (eds N. Tuteja, S. S. Gill, A. F. Tiburcio and R. Tuteja), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527632930.ch38

Editor Information

  1. 3

    International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Plant Molecular Biology Group, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, India

  2. 4

    MD University, Centre for Biotechnology, Rohtak 124 001, Haryana, India

  3. 5

    Aligarh Muslim University, Department of Botany, Aligarh 202 002, Uttar Pradesh, India

  4. 6

    Universitat de Barcelona, Unitat de Fisiologia Vegetal, Facultat de Farmàcia, Av. Joan XXIII, S/N, 08028 Barcelona, Spain

Author Information

  1. 1

    Università della Tuscia, Naturalistica e Idraulica per il Territorio, Dipartimento di Geologia e Ingegneria Meccanica, 01100 Viterbo, Italy

  2. 2

    Lebanese University, Faculty of Agricultural Engineering and Veterinary Medicine, Department of Crop Production, Dekwaneh-El Maten, Beirut, Lebanon

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 MAR 2012
  2. Published Print: 14 MAR 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527328406

Online ISBN: 9783527632930

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • alkalinity;
  • grafting;
  • heavy metals;
  • rootstocks;
  • salinity;
  • vegetables

Summary

Owing to limited availability of arable land and the high market demand for vegetables around the world, Solanaceae and Cucurbitaceae crops are frequently cultivated under unfavorable soil conditions. These include salinity, alkalinity, heavy metals, and excessive amount of trace elements. Plants exposed to adverse chemical soil conditions exhibit various physiological and biochemical disorders leading to stunted growth and severe yield loss. One way to avoid or reduce losses in production caused by adverse soil chemical conditions in vegetables would be to graft them onto rootstocks capable of reducing the effect of external stresses on the shoot. Grafting is an integrative reciprocal process and, therefore, both scion and rootstock can influence tolerance of grafted plants to adverse soil chemical conditions. Grafted plants grown under adverse soil chemical conditions often exhibited greater growth and yield, higher photosynthesis, better nutritional status, and lower accumulation of Na+ and/or Cl, heavy metals, and excessive amount of trace elements in shoots than ungrafted or self-grafted plants. This chapter gives an overview of the recent literature on the response of grafted plants to adverse soil chemical conditions and the mechanisms of tolerance to adverse soil chemical conditions in grafted plants related to the morphological root characteristics and the physiological and biochemical processes. The chapter will conclude by identifying several prospects for future research aiming to improve the role of grafting in vegetable crops grown under abiotic stress conditions.