42. Tomato: Grafting to Improve Salt Tolerance

  1. Dr. Narendra Tuteja4,5,
  2. Dr. Sarvajeet Singh Gill4,6,
  3. Prof. Antonio F. Tiburcio7 and
  4. Dr. Renu Tuteja4
  1. Paloma Sanchez-Bel7,
  2. Isabel Egea1,
  3. Francisco B. Flores2 and
  4. Maria C. Bolarin2,3

Published Online: 30 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9783527632930.ch42

Improving Crop Resistance to Abiotic Stress, Volume 1 & Volume 2

Improving Crop Resistance to Abiotic Stress, Volume 1 & Volume 2

How to Cite

Sanchez-Bel, P., Egea, I., Flores, F. B. and Bolarin, M. C. (2012) Tomato: Grafting to Improve Salt Tolerance, in Improving Crop Resistance to Abiotic Stress, Volume 1 & Volume 2 (eds N. Tuteja, S. S. Gill, A. F. Tiburcio and R. Tuteja), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527632930.ch42

Editor Information

  1. 4

    International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Plant Molecular Biology Group, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, India

  2. 5

    MD University, Centre for Biotechnology, Rohtak 124 001, Haryana, India

  3. 6

    Aligarh Muslim University, Department of Botany, Aligarh 202 002, Uttar Pradesh, India

  4. 7

    Universitat de Barcelona, Unitat de Fisiologia Vegetal, Facultat de Farmàcia, Av. Joan XXIII, S/N, 08028 Barcelona, Spain

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Stress Biology and Plant Pathology, Campus de Espinardo, Apdo 164, Espinardo, 30100 Murcia, Spain

  2. 2

    CEBAS-CSIC Department of Stress Biology and Plant Pathology, Campus de Espinardo, Apdo 164, Espinardo, 30100 Murcia, Spain

  3. 3

    Universidad de Almería, Escuela Politécnica Superior, 04120 Almería, Spain

  4. 7

    Universitat de Barcelona, Unitat de Fisiologia Vegetal, Facultat de Farmàcia, Av. Joan XXIII, S/N, 08028 Barcelona, Spain

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 MAR 2012
  2. Published Print: 14 MAR 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527328406

Online ISBN: 9783527632930

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Keywords:

  • abiotic stress;
  • grafting;
  • QTL;
  • osmotic adjustment;
  • rootstock-scion union;
  • salinity tolerance

Summary

Salinity is considered one of the main factors that limit crop productivity, and development of crop species tolerant to this abiotic stress is vital to meet the growing food demand through sustainable agriculture. Therefore, the greatest challenge in the coming years is to increase crop production in such abiotic stress-affected lands as occur in areas affected by salinity. Tomato is considered one of the most economically important vegetable crops in the world, but unfortunately it is salt sensitive. The commercial success obtained through traditional breeding programs with regard to salinity tolerance has been very scarce because of the complexity of the plant response to the stress. One way of avoiding or reducing losses in production caused by salinity in high-yield genotypes would be to graft them onto rootstocks capable of reducing the effect of external salt on the shoot. This strategy could also provide the plant breeder with the possibility of combining good shoot characteristics with good root characteristics and of studying the contribution of genes transcribed in the roots to their performance on the shoot. This chapter gives an overview on the main physiological processes involved in the salt tolerance response of grafted tomato plants and illustrates how grafting can enhance salt tolerance in tomato, determined by fruit yield, a key agronomic parameter. Moreover, it is important to highlight that the salt tolerance conferred by the rootstock to the shoot genotype in terms of fruit yield seems to be a heritable trait. However, it is still necessary to conduct a good deal of research work in order to simplify the process of rootstock selection, as different results may be obtained depending on the shoot and root genotypes, as well as the salt levels and exposure times of the grafted plants.