52. Mustard: Approaches for Crop Improvement and Abiotic Stress Tolerance

  1. Dr. Narendra Tuteja4,5,
  2. Dr. Sarvajeet Singh Gill4,6,
  3. Prof. Antonio F. Tiburcio7 and
  4. Dr. Renu Tuteja4
  1. Sarvajeet Singh Gill4,6,
  2. Ritu Gill5,
  3. Gautam Kumar1,
  4. Ashwani Pareek1,
  5. Prabodh C. Sharma2,
  6. Naser A. Anjum3 and
  7. Narendra Tuteja4,5

Published Online: 30 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9783527632930.ch52

Improving Crop Resistance to Abiotic Stress, Volume 1 & Volume 2

Improving Crop Resistance to Abiotic Stress, Volume 1 & Volume 2

How to Cite

Gill, S. S., Gill, R., Kumar, G., Pareek, A., Sharma, P. C., Anjum, N. A. and Tuteja, N. (2012) Mustard: Approaches for Crop Improvement and Abiotic Stress Tolerance, in Improving Crop Resistance to Abiotic Stress, Volume 1 & Volume 2 (eds N. Tuteja, S. S. Gill, A. F. Tiburcio and R. Tuteja), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527632930.ch52

Editor Information

  1. 4

    International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Plant Molecular Biology Group, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, India

  2. 5

    MD University, Centre for Biotechnology, Rohtak 124 001, Haryana, India

  3. 6

    Aligarh Muslim University, Department of Botany, Aligarh 202 002, Uttar Pradesh, India

  4. 7

    Universitat de Barcelona, Unitat de Fisiologia Vegetal, Facultat de Farmàcia, Av. Joan XXIII, S/N, 08028 Barcelona, Spain

Author Information

  1. 1

    Jawaharlal Nehru University, School of Life Sciences, Stress Physiology and Molecular Biology Laboratory, New Delhi 110 067, India

  2. 2

    Central Soil Salinity Research Institute Zarifa Farm, Karnal 132 001, India

  3. 3

    University of Aveiro, Centre for Environmental and Marine, Studies (CESAM) and Department of Chemistry, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal

  4. 4

    International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Plant Molecular Biology Group, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, India

  5. 5

    MD University, Centre for Biotechnology, Rohtak 124 001, Haryana, India

  6. 6

    Aligarh Muslim University, Department of Botany, Aligarh 202 002, Uttar Pradesh, India

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 MAR 2012
  2. Published Print: 14 MAR 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527328406

Online ISBN: 9783527632930

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Keywords:

  • alkalinity;
  • brassica;
  • abiotic stress;
  • stress tolerance;
  • omics;
  • salinity stress

Summary

Adverse environmental conditions seriously affect crop growth, productivity, and genome stability. These adverse environmental factors are a menace for plants that prevent them from reaching their full genetic potential and therefore limit the crop productivity worldwide. Stress conditions, such as extreme temperatures, water availability, and ion toxicity, represent abiotic stresses, which cause massive loss of crop yield. Global climatic pattern is also becoming more unpredictable with increased occurrence of drought, flood, storms, heat waves, and seawater intrusion. The oleiferous Brassica is the third most important source of vegetable oil in the world after palm and soybean oil and grown as an edible or an industrial oil crop that is used as a source of edible protein, in much the same way as soybean protein. According to a report of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the world oilseed production was 397 metric ton in 2006–2007 and Indian agriculture contributed about 15 and 8% to the world total acreage under oilseed cultivation and production, respectively. However, the average productivity in India is only 791 kg ha−1 compared to the world average of 1718 kg ha−1. Despite a large area under cultivation of mustard, the productivity of the crop has dropped in recent years because plant growth and development are affected by various abiotic stress factors. Protecting crop productivity under unfavorable environmental conditions is a major challenge for modern agriculture. In this review, we have attempted to provide an overview of success obtained in raising germplasm with improved salinity tolerance through breeding methods. The recent “Omics” approaches and their applications in abiotic stress research on mustard crop are also presented.