7. Excess Soil Phosphorus: Accelerated P Transfer, Water Quality Deterioration, and Sustainable Remediation Strategies

  1. Dr. Narendra Tuteja2,3,
  2. Dr. Sarvajeet Singh Gill2,4,
  3. Prof. Antonio F. Tiburcio5 and
  4. Dr. Renu Tuteja2
  1. Nilesh C. Sharma and
  2. Shivendra V. Sahi

Published Online: 30 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9783527632930.ch7

Improving Crop Resistance to Abiotic Stress, Volume 1 & Volume 2

Improving Crop Resistance to Abiotic Stress, Volume 1 & Volume 2

How to Cite

Sharma, N. C. and Sahi, S. V. (2012) Excess Soil Phosphorus: Accelerated P Transfer, Water Quality Deterioration, and Sustainable Remediation Strategies, in Improving Crop Resistance to Abiotic Stress, Volume 1 & Volume 2 (eds N. Tuteja, S. S. Gill, A. F. Tiburcio and R. Tuteja), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527632930.ch7

Editor Information

  1. 2

    International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Plant Molecular Biology Group, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, India

  2. 3

    MD University, Centre for Biotechnology, Rohtak 124 001, Haryana, India

  3. 4

    Aligarh Muslim University, Department of Botany, Aligarh 202 002, Uttar Pradesh, India

  4. 5

    Universitat de Barcelona, Unitat de Fisiologia Vegetal, Facultat de Farmàcia, Av. Joan XXIII, S/N, 08028 Barcelona, Spain

Author Information

  1. Western Kentucky University, Department of Biology, 1906 College Height Blvd. 11080, Bowling Green, KY 42101-1080, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 MAR 2012
  2. Published Print: 14 MAR 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527328406

Online ISBN: 9783527632930

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Keywords:

  • chemical amendment;
  • eutrophication;
  • P accumulation;
  • P immobilization;
  • phytoremediation;
  • soil test P

Summary

Phosphorus is a limiting nutrient for plant growth. Yet its high accumulation in agricultural soils causes grave environmental concerns affecting human health. The problem is more acute in temperate climate where large farms with intensive animal-based agriculture generate and dump huge amounts of organic litter or manure – a potential source of phosphorus (P). Need for removal of excess P is increasingly felt in recent times giving rise to various remediation strategies: chemical, physical, and biological. Application of chemical amendments, such as lime, ferric chloride, or alum to animal manures or soils enriched with P is one of the methods used commonly in recent times. P immobilization in soil by these amendments may not be stable on a long-term basis. Another strategy to address the excess manure P involves the treatment of animal feed with additives such as phytase and vitamin D that can increase the digestibility of P in diet. Although phytase can decrease total P in litter, it can increase the water-soluble phosphorus in the litter and hence the potential for P losses to surface waters following land application. Likewise, application of biosolids as P fertilizer is also not considered the best management practice from P loss standpoint. Alternatively, phytoremediation, plant-assisted removal of water-soluble P, could be an attractive strategy. Mining of soil P, which includes harvesting P taken up from the soil by a crop grown without external P application, is being examined as one of the crop management strategies for P-impacted soils. It has also been suggested that for the success of P mining, the remedial strategy should include plants that can accumulate P manifold higher (>1% DW) than the P content of common plants. Employing plant species with capabilities like overexpression of root phosphatase and assimilation of organic P from soil P pool could enhance the efficacy of P phytoremediation. Studies suggest that integrating best management practices for all the operations involved in P use, from animal feeding strategies to manure management, to soil and crop management, and to soil P test methods or P loss tools can effectively reduce the environmental risks of diffuse P pollution.