9. Translational Biology Approaches to Improve Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Crops

  1. Dr. Narendra Tuteja4,5,
  2. Dr. Sarvajeet Singh Gill4,6,
  3. Prof. Antonio F. Tiburcio7 and
  4. Dr. Renu Tuteja4
  1. Rina Iannacone1,
  2. Francesco Cellini1,
  3. Giorgio Morelli2,3 and
  4. Ida Ruberti3

Published Online: 30 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9783527632930.ch9

Improving Crop Resistance to Abiotic Stress, Volume 1 & Volume 2

Improving Crop Resistance to Abiotic Stress, Volume 1 & Volume 2

How to Cite

Iannacone, R., Cellini, F., Morelli, G. and Ruberti, I. (2012) Translational Biology Approaches to Improve Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Crops, in Improving Crop Resistance to Abiotic Stress, Volume 1 & Volume 2 (eds N. Tuteja, S. S. Gill, A. F. Tiburcio and R. Tuteja), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527632930.ch9

Editor Information

  1. 4

    International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Plant Molecular Biology Group, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, India

  2. 5

    MD University, Centre for Biotechnology, Rohtak 124 001, Haryana, India

  3. 6

    Aligarh Muslim University, Department of Botany, Aligarh 202 002, Uttar Pradesh, India

  4. 7

    Universitat de Barcelona, Unitat de Fisiologia Vegetal, Facultat de Farmàcia, Av. Joan XXIII, S/N, 08028 Barcelona, Spain

Author Information

  1. 1

    Metapontum Agrobios, S.S. Jonica 106 Km 448, 2, 75100 Metaponto (MT), Italy

  2. 2

    National Research Institute for Food and Nutrition, Via Ardeatina 546, 00178 Rome, Italy

  3. 3

    National Research Council, Institute of Molecular Biology and Pathology, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome, Italy

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 MAR 2012
  2. Published Print: 14 MAR 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527328406

Online ISBN: 9783527632930

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Keywords:

  • abiotic stress tolerance;
  • genomic revolution;
  • osmolytes;
  • phenomics;
  • translational biology

Summary

In the last decades, several genes that regulate abiotic stress response were identified in the model plant Arabidopsis. The completion of the Arabidopsis genome sequence in 2000 and the development of molecular high-throughput “omics” platforms have speeded up the simultaneous functional characterization of genes that regulate the abiotic stress tolerance in plants. The fundamental molecular mechanisms that underlie the plant abiotic responses are quite conserved among plant species and therefore the knowledge gained in the model plant Arabidopsis can be exploited to improve stress tolerance in crop species. Many examples demonstrate that ectopic expression of key genes involved in the stress response can induce stress tolerance in different crops, demonstrating the potential of the translational approaches. Nevertheless, generation of crops that have improved tolerance under field conditions is still a challenge. However, systems biology studies in model plants and “omics” approaches in crop species can certainly contribute to the understanding of the interplay between response pathways to different abiotic stresses, a condition that is commonly found in open fields.