8. Glasses as Accumulators of Free Energy and Other Unusual Applications of Glasses

  1. Dr. habil. Jürn W. P. Schmelzer1,
  2. Prof. Ivan S. Gutzow2,
  3. Prof. Oleg V. Mazurin Ph.D., D.Sc.3,
  4. Prof. Alexander I. Priven Ph.D., D.Sc.3,4,
  5. Dr. Snejana V. Todorova5 and
  6. Dr. Boris P. Petroff6
  1. Prof. Ivan S. Gutzow2 and
  2. Dr. Snejana V. Todorova5

Published Online: 22 MAR 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9783527636532.ch8

Glasses and the Glass Transition

Glasses and the Glass Transition

How to Cite

Schmelzer, J. W. P., Gutzow, I. S., Mazurin, O. V., Priven, A. I., Todorova, S. V. and Petroff, B. P. (2011) Glasses as Accumulators of Free Energy and Other Unusual Applications of Glasses, in Glasses and the Glass Transition, Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527636532.ch8

Author Information

  1. 1

    Institut für Physik, Universität Rostock, Rostock, Germany

  2. 2

    Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physical Chemistry, Sofia, Bulgaria

  3. 3

    Thermex, St. Petersburg, Russian Federation

  4. 4

    ITC Inc., St Petersburg, Russia

  5. 5

    Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Geophysical Institute, Sofia, Bulgarien

  6. 6

    Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solid State Physics, Sofia, Bulgarien

Author Information

  1. 2

    Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physical Chemistry, Sofia, Bulgaria

  2. 5

    Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Geophysical Institute, Sofia, Bulgarien

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 22 MAR 2011
  2. Published Print: 6 APR 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527409686

Online ISBN: 9783527636532

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Keywords:

  • accumulated energy in glasses;
  • defect crystals;
  • frozen-in entropy and enthalpy;
  • glasses as batteries;
  • kinetic fragility;
  • reactivity of glasses;
  • agriglasses

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Ways to Describe the Glass Transition, the Properties of Glasses and of Defect Crystals: a Recapitulation

  • Simon's Approximation, the Thermodynamic Structural Factor, the Kinetic Fragility of Liquids and the Thermodynamic Properties of Defect Crystals

  • The Energy, Accumulated in Glasses and Defect Crystals: Simple Geometric Estimates of Frozen-in Entropy and Enthalpy

  • Three Direct Ways to Liberate the Energy, Frozen-in in Glasses: Crystallization, Dissolution and Chemical Reactions

  • The Fourth Possibility to Release the Energy of Glass: the Glass/Crystal Galvanic Cell

  • Thermoelectric Driving Force at Metallic Glass/Crystal Contacts: the Seebeck and the Peltier Effects

  • Unusual Methods of Formation of Glasses in Nature and Their Technical Significance

  • Some Conclusions and a Discussion of Results and Possibilities