16. Stretchable Neural Interfaces

  1. Prof. Takao Someya
  1. Woo Hyeun Kang1,
  2. Wenzhe Cao2,
  3. Sigurd Wagner3 and
  4. Barclay Morrison III1

Published Online: 28 DEC 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9783527646982.ch16

Stretchable Electronics

Stretchable Electronics

How to Cite

Kang, W. H., Cao, W., Wagner, S. and Morrison, B. (2012) Stretchable Neural Interfaces, in Stretchable Electronics (ed T. Someya), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527646982.ch16

Editor Information

  1. The University of Tokyo, Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan

Author Information

  1. 1

    Columbia University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 351 Engineering Terrace, MC 8904, 1210 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, NY 10027, USA

  2. 2

    Princeton University, Department of Electrical Engineering and Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials, F310 Engineering Quad, Olden Street, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA

  3. 3

    Princeton University, Department of Electrical Engineering and Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials, B422 Engineering Quad, Olden Street, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 DEC 2012
  2. Published Print: 19 DEC 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527329786

Online ISBN: 9783527646982

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Keywords:

  • microelectrode arrays;
  • signal-to-noise ratio;
  • elastic substrate;
  • polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS);
  • photopatternable silicone (PPS);
  • printed circuit boards

Summary

Recent advances in stretchable electronics have driven progress in the area of stretchable neural interfaces. Earlier, recording from neurons was accomplished with electrodes made of rigid materials like glass, silicon, or metals. Advances in traditional integrated circuit and microelectromechanical manufacture gave rise to rigid microelectrode arrays, which were capable of recording from tens or hundreds of neurons simultaneously. However, rigid arrays pose certain disadvantages because they are orders of magnitude stiffer than the target neural tissues. In contrast, stretchable microelectrode arrays more closely match the moduli of brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves, and are hypothesized to reduce micromotion damage during long-term implantation. Their ability to stretch also opens new applications including the study of mechanisms of neuronal mechanotransduction. In this chapter, the current state of the art in stretchable microelectrode arrays is described with a critical assessment of their advantages and disadvantages, and future directions for the field are explored.