10. Biodegradable Polymer Materials from Proteins Produced by the Animal Coproducts Industry: Bloodmeal

  1. Juan P. Hinestroza and
  2. Anil N. Netravali
  1. Suraj Sharma1,2,
  2. Fehime Vatansever1,
  3. James N. Hodges1 and
  4. Igor Luzinov1

Published Online: 21 MAR 2014

DOI: 10.1002/9783527649440.ch10

Cellulose Based Composites: Cellulose Based Composites

Cellulose Based Composites: Cellulose Based Composites

How to Cite

Sharma, S., Vatansever, F., Hodges, J. N. and Luzinov, I. (2014) Biodegradable Polymer Materials from Proteins Produced by the Animal Coproducts Industry: Bloodmeal, in Cellulose Based Composites: Cellulose Based Composites (eds J. P. Hinestroza and A. N. Netravali), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527649440.ch10

Editor Information

  1. Cornell University, Department of Fiber Science & Apparel Design, 242 MVR Hall, 37 Forest Home Drive, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Clemson University, School of Materials Science and Engineering, 161 Sirrine Hall, Clemson, SC 29634, USA

  2. 2

    University of Georgia, Department of Textiles, Merchandising and Interiors, 321 Dawson Hall, Athens, GA 30602, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 MAR 2014
  2. Published Print: 17 MAR 2014

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527327195

Online ISBN: 9783527649440

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Keywords:

  • bloodmeal;
  • bioplastics;
  • denaturation;
  • modulus;
  • stress-at-break;
  • strain-at-break

Summary

This chapter describes the fabrication and properties of polymeric materials made from partially denatured proteins produced by the animal coproduct (rendering) industry. Specifically, plastic samples from partially denatured bloodmeal proteins were successfully produced by a compression molding process. The modulus (stiffness) of the material obtained was found to be comparable with that of commercial synthetic materials, such as polystyrene, but was found to have lower toughness characteristics, which is a common phenomenon among plastics produced from animal and plant proteins. Plastics were also fabricated from blends of bloodmeal with undenatured animal proteins such as albumen and whey. The resultant plastic samples demonstrated improved mechanical properties, specifically tensile strength, as compared to neat plastics from bloodmeal proteins.