8. Risk Assessment of Abiotic Stress Tolerant GM Crops

  1. Dr. Narendra Tuteja2,
  2. Dr. Sarvajeet Singh Gill2,3 and
  3. Dr. Renu Tuteja4
  1. Paul Howles and
  2. Joe Smith

Published Online: 18 DEC 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9783527665334.ch8

Improving Crop Productivity in Sustainable Agriculture

Improving Crop Productivity in Sustainable Agriculture

How to Cite

Howles, P. and Smith, J. (2012) Risk Assessment of Abiotic Stress Tolerant GM Crops, in Improving Crop Productivity in Sustainable Agriculture (eds N. Tuteja, S. S. Gill and R. Tuteja), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527665334.ch8

Editor Information

  1. 2

    International Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (ICGEB), Plant Molecular Biology Group, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, India

  2. 3

    MD University, Faculty of Life Sciences, Centre for Biotechnology, Stress Physiology and Molecular Biology Lab, Rohtak 124 001, Haryana, India

  3. 4

    International Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (ICGEB), Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, India

Author Information

  1. Office of the Gene Technology Regulator, 15 National Circuit, Canberra, ACT 2600, Australia

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 DEC 2012
  2. Published Print: 5 DEC 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527332427

Online ISBN: 9783527665334

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Keywords:

  • abiotic stress;
  • genetically modified crops;
  • gene transfer;
  • invasiveness;
  • pleiotropy;
  • risk assessment;
  • weediness

Summary

Genetically modified (GM) crops engineered with herbicide tolerance and/or insect resistance have been grown on a commercial scale throughout the world for well over a decade. A new generation of GM crops, containing a greater variety of traits, including tolerance to abiotic stresses, is currently in field trials and/or approaching commercialization. Whereas engineering of herbicide tolerance or insect resistance can be achieved by insertion of single genes with clearly defined roles and highly specific mechanisms, tolerance to abiotic stresses involves the interaction of numerous genes and regulatory pathways. This chapter outlines the likely issues for consideration in risk assessment for the commercial release of a GM plant with a novel abiotic stress tolerance trait. To inform the discussion, the chapter begins with an overview of current understanding of plant responses to abiotic stress, and how this knowledge is being used to engineer various types of stress tolerance into GM plants.