12. Hydrogen as an Enabler for Renewable Energies

  1. Prof. Detlef Stolten1,2 and
  2. Prof. Dr.-Ing. Viktor Scherer3
  1. Prof. Detlef Stolten1,2,
  2. Bernd Emonts2,
  3. Thomas Grube2 and
  4. Michael Weber2

Published Online: 21 JUN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9783527673872.ch12

Transition to Renewable Energy Systems

Transition to Renewable Energy Systems

How to Cite

Stolten, D., Emonts, B., Grube, T. and Weber, M. (2013) Hydrogen as an Enabler for Renewable Energies, in Transition to Renewable Energy Systems (eds D. Stolten and V. Scherer), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527673872.ch12

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, IEF-3: Fuel Cells, Leo-Brandt-Straße, IEF-3: Fuel Cells, 52425 Jülich, Germany

  2. 2

    Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, IEK-3 Institut für En. & Klimaforschung, Wilhelm-Johnen-Str., 52428 Jülich, Germany

  3. 3

    Ruhr-Universität Bochum LS f. Energieanlagen, IB 3/126 Universitätsstr. 150 LS f. Energieanlagen, IB 3/126 44780 Bochum Germany

Author Information

  1. 1

    Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, IEF-3: Fuel Cells, Leo-Brandt-Straße, IEF-3: Fuel Cells, 52425 Jülich, Germany

  2. 2

    Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, IEK-3 Institut für En. & Klimaforschung, Wilhelm-Johnen-Str., 52428 Jülich, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 JUN 2013
  2. Published Print: 28 MAY 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527332397

Online ISBN: 9783527673872

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Keywords:

  • fuel cells;
  • energy storage;
  • wind energy;
  • electrolysis;
  • residual load;
  • emissions;
  • climate goals;
  • excess energy;
  • cost competitiveness;
  • investment cost

Summary

An energy supply concept for Germany is outlined and discussed. It is based on wind energy, electrolysis, the use of hydrogen with fuel cells in the road sector, and covering residual load with natural gas power plants. With the number of wind turbines in place as of 2011, virtually upgraded to 7 MW each for this concept, all of the power supply could be provided and three-quarters of the German passenger transportation by cars. About 80% of that energy would originate from wind power and 10% would be furnished by natural gas, needed for compensating the fluctuating renewable energy input. Hydrogen energy turns out to be a cornerstone in the concept, making excess production of renewable power valuable through the use of hydrogen in cars as a substitute for oil-based fuels. When considering energy efficiency and cost together it is paramount not to optimize the power sector, gas sector, and transportation sector separately. Minimum cost of a completely new energy system can only be achieved via integrated solutions over the three sectors. In this case, the use of renewable power in cars that has been produced in excess and turned into hydrogen as a fuel substitute provides a reasonable business model to handle excess power inevitably produced by renewable energy. The model reduces CO2 emissions by 55% compared with 1990 levels.