25. Flexible Power Generation from Biomass – An Opportunity for a Renewable Sources-Based Energy System?

  1. Prof. Detlef Stolten2,3 and
  2. Prof. Dr.-Ing. Viktor Scherer4
  1. Daniela Thrän,
  2. Marcus Eichhorn,
  3. Alexander Krautz,
  4. Subhashree Das and
  5. Nora Szarka

Published Online: 21 JUN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9783527673872.ch25

Transition to Renewable Energy Systems

Transition to Renewable Energy Systems

How to Cite

Thrän, D., Eichhorn, M., Krautz, A., Das, S. and Szarka, N. (2013) Flexible Power Generation from Biomass – An Opportunity for a Renewable Sources-Based Energy System?, in Transition to Renewable Energy Systems (eds D. Stolten and V. Scherer), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527673872.ch25

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, IEF-3: Fuel Cells, Leo-Brandt-Straße, IEF-3: Fuel Cells, 52425 Jülich, Germany

  2. 3

    Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, IEK-3 Institut für En. & Klimaforschung, Wilhelm-Johnen-Str., 52428 Jülich, Germany

  3. 4

    Ruhr-Universität Bochum LS f. Energieanlagen, IB 3/126 Universitätsstr. 150 LS f. Energieanlagen, IB 3/126 44780 Bochum Germany

Author Information

  1. Helmholtz-Zentrum für, Umweltforschung – UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 JUN 2013
  2. Published Print: 28 MAY 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527332397

Online ISBN: 9783527673872

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • renewable energy;
  • Germany;
  • power market;
  • biomass;
  • biogas;
  • Renewable Energy Sources Act

Summary

Power generation from renewable energy in Germany is growing rapidly. An increasing share of wind power and photovoltaics with their intermittent character presents a challenge to maintain the electricity demand–supply balance. Currently, storage options for electricity are limited. Therefore, an interesting question is how biomass can fill the expected gaps from wind and solar. Power generation from biomass has been established under the German EEG for 15 years in almost 8000 combined heat and power (CHP) plants all over the country. For solid, liquid, and gaseous biofuels, different concepts for flexible power generation for the short-term demand are discussed. The optional pathways for increasing the flexibility of the operation of a CHP system include (i) gas and thermal storage, (ii) the development of new biological and technical solutions, and (iii) pooling of small plants into larger units. Under the EEG, first incentives have been set for flexible electricity production driven by the demands of the power market. However, a clearer role of power from biomass in the energy policy can still foster the introduction of flexible power in the short term and may additionally support the technical development of biomass provision and conversion.