31. Geological Storage for the Transition from Natural to Hydrogen Gas

  1. Prof. Detlef Stolten1,2 and
  2. Prof. Dr.-Ing. Viktor Scherer3
  1. Jürgen Wackerl2,
  2. Martin Streibel,
  3. Axel Liebscher and
  4. Detlef Stolten1,2

Published Online: 21 JUN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9783527673872.ch31

Transition to Renewable Energy Systems

Transition to Renewable Energy Systems

How to Cite

Wackerl, J., Streibel, M., Liebscher, A. and Stolten, D. (2013) Geological Storage for the Transition from Natural to Hydrogen Gas, in Transition to Renewable Energy Systems (eds D. Stolten and V. Scherer), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527673872.ch31

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, IEF-3: Fuel Cells, Leo-Brandt-Straße, IEF-3: Fuel Cells, 52425 Jülich, Germany

  2. 2

    Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, IEK-3 Institut für En. & Klimaforschung, Wilhelm-Johnen-Str., 52428 Jülich, Germany

  3. 3

    Ruhr-Universität Bochum LS f. Energieanlagen, IB 3/126 Universitätsstr. 150 LS f. Energieanlagen, IB 3/126 44780 Bochum Germany

Author Information

  1. 1

    Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, IEF-3: Fuel Cells, Leo-Brandt-Straße, IEF-3: Fuel Cells, 52425 Jülich, Germany

  2. 2

    Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, IEK-3 Institut für En. & Klimaforschung, Wilhelm-Johnen-Str., 52428 Jülich, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 JUN 2013
  2. Published Print: 28 MAY 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527332397

Online ISBN: 9783527673872

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Keywords:

  • energy storage;
  • gas storage;
  • geological storage;
  • natural gas;
  • hydrogen;
  • salt caverns;
  • aquifers;
  • pore-space storage sites

Summary

The increasing importance of renewable energy sources such as wind energy as a supplement to or replacement for existing energy sources such as fossil fuels adds challenges to the current and future energy market. Since most of the renewables are generally noncontinuous in the delivery of electrical energy, for example, there are times with high peak power but also with zero power output, new options have to be considered. One of them is the conversion of electricity to hydrogen gas. The energy produced, especially electrical energy, can then be used at different times rather than when peak power is available. Additionally, the use of hydrogen as an intermediate energy carrier is CO2 free and can be applied in various chemical and engineering processes. Since huge amounts of energy need to be buffered to cope with the seasonal variations of production and consumption, geological storage options for hydrogen gas are strongly favored. An overview of currently established geological storage options for natural gas is presented and used as a reference to provide an outlook on future but near-term storage options for hydrogen gas.