32. Near-Surface Bulk Storage of Hydrogen

  1. Prof. Detlef Stolten1,2 and
  2. Prof. Dr.-Ing. Viktor Scherer3
  1. Vanessa Tietze and
  2. Sebastian Luhr

Published Online: 21 JUN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9783527673872.ch32

Transition to Renewable Energy Systems

Transition to Renewable Energy Systems

How to Cite

Tietze, V. and Luhr, S. (2013) Near-Surface Bulk Storage of Hydrogen, in Transition to Renewable Energy Systems (eds D. Stolten and V. Scherer), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527673872.ch32

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, IEF-3: Fuel Cells, Leo-Brandt-Straße, IEF-3: Fuel Cells, 52425 Jülich, Germany

  2. 2

    Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, IEK-3 Institut für En. & Klimaforschung, Wilhelm-Johnen-Str., 52428 Jülich, Germany

  3. 3

    Ruhr-Universität Bochum LS f. Energieanlagen, IB 3/126 Universitätsstr. 150 LS f. Energieanlagen, IB 3/126 44780 Bochum Germany

Author Information

  1. Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, IEK-3 Institut für En. & Klimaforschung, Wilhelm-Johnen-Str., 52428 Jülich, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 JUN 2013
  2. Published Print: 28 MAY 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527332397

Online ISBN: 9783527673872

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Keywords:

  • hydrogen;
  • storage;
  • bulk;
  • near-surface;
  • above ground;
  • stationary;
  • infrastructure

Summary

In future sustainable energy systems, hydrogen could be employed in addition to its current chemical usage as a versatile energy carrier. This requires the buildup of a hydrogen delivery infrastructure with facilities for stationary large- and small-scale storage. One option for large-scale storage is to use underground storage, but good geological conditions do not exist everywhere. For this reason, alternatives for the storage of large quantities of hydrogen could be of great importance. This chapter is therefore dedicated to bulk hydrogen storage in vessels that can be located above ground or buried a few meters below the surface. Thereby, the considerations are confined to storage technologies for which no technical obstacle to their use is expected. These are containments for compressed gaseous hydrogen, cryogenic liquid hydrogen, and metal hydrides. In addition to technical data, cost estimates and economic targets are also presented. Further, a technical assessment of the storage efficiency and capacity of selected storage technologies with respect to the daily hydrogen demand of a fueling station is given.