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Keywords:

  • Comprehension ;
  • Metacognition;
  • Family literacy ;
  • Community-based programs;
  • resources;
  • Home language;
  • Home-school connections;
  • Intergenerational literacy;
  • Parental involvement;
  • Socioeconomic factors;
  • Fluency ;
  • Oral reading;
  • read-alouds;
  • Motivation/engagement ;
  • Affective influences;
  • Aliteracy;
  • Attitude;
  • x Choice;
  • preference;
  • Expectations;
  • Extrinsic;
  • Interest;
  • Intrinsic;
  • Persistence;
  • Self-efficacy;
  • Oral language ;
  • Discussion;
  • Phonics ;
  • phonemic awareness ;
  • phonological awareness ;
  • Invented spelling;
  • Policy ;
  • Legislation;
  • mandates;
  • Strategies ;
  • methods ;
  • and materials ;
  • Instructional strategies;
  • teaching strategies;
  • Reading strategies;
  • Struggling learners ;
  • Achievement gap;
  • Instructional intervention;
  • Teacher education ;
  • professional development ;
  • In-service;
  • Theoretical perspectives ;
  • Sociocognitive;
  • Vocabulary ;
  • General vocabulary;
  • To learners in which of the following categories does your work apply? ;
  • Early childhood ;
  • Childhood ;
  • Early adolescence ;
  • Special needs

Abstract

We now have an evidence base that documents that we could teach every child by the end of first grade. However, most schools have almost none of the key aspects of instruction that have been available in the research to ensure we achieve this goal. In this paper I argue that this failure is not the result of inadequate funding but rather primarily results from an aged system of beliefs about the inevitability that some students will always fail to learn to read. That belief system along with a lack of familiarity with what researchers have demonstrated in the past decade perpetuate schooling where far too many children fail to thrive as readers. In the end, it is up to us, the adults in the school system, to alter our efforts such that every child becomes a reader.