Attention and Memory for Newspaper Advertisements: Effects of Ad–Editorial Congruency and Location

Authors

  • Jaana Simola,

    Corresponding author
    1. Cognitive Science, Institute of Behavioral Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
    2. Cognitive Brain Research Unit (CBRU), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
    • Department of Marketing, Aalto University, Helsinki, Finland
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  • Markus Kivikangas,

    1. Cognitive Science, Institute of Behavioral Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
    2. Cognitive Brain Research Unit (CBRU), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
    3. Center of Knowledge and Innovation Research (CKIR), Aalto University, Helsinki, Finland
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  • Jarmo Kuisma,

    1. Department of Marketing, Aalto University, Helsinki, Finland
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  • Christina M. Krause

    1. Cognitive Science, Institute of Behavioral Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
    2. Cognitive Brain Research Unit (CBRU), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
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Correspondence to: Jaana Simola, Cognitive Science/CBRU, PO Box 9, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland.

E-mail: jaana.simola@helsinki.fi

Summary

Previous research suggests that the same ad can have different effects depending upon the media context in which the ad appears. This experiment investigated how the semantic relation between the content of advertisements and editorial texts, and the ad location on newspaper pages affect attention and memory for advertisements. We recorded participants' eye movements while they read newspaper articles to rate how interesting the texts were. Recognition for ads, logos, and editorial headlines was measured on the following day. Results revealed a discrepancy between attention and memory results, suggesting that incongruency increased attention to ads, whereas congruency improved recognition of ads. In addition, ads presented on the right attracted more attention and were recognized better than ads on the left. The results have implications for pretesting of advertisements, because attention and memory for ads were associated with higher preference for brands, and purchase intention was enhanced for the brands that were recognized. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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