Is Fibromyalgia Diagnosed With New Criteria Considerably Different From Fibromyalgia Diagnosed With Old Criteria? Comment on the Article by Wolfe et al

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In an article published in Arthritis Care & Research, Wolfe et al reported that the prevalence of fibromyalgia in the general population is 2.1%, with 2.4% in women and 1.8% in men ([1]), based on approximately the same criteria of the modification of the 2010 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) fibromyalgia criteria ([2]). It has been reported that 7.4% of rheumatoid arthritis patients satisfied the modification of the 2010 ACR fibromyalgia criteria, with 8.1% of women and 7.0% of men ([3]). Based on the 1990 ACR fibromyalgia criteria ([4]), it has been reported that the prevalence of women is several times that of men ([5]). Is fibromyalgia diagnosed with the modification of the 2010 ACR fibromyalgia criteria ([2]) or the 2010 ACR fibromyalgia criteria ([6]) considerably different from fibromyalgia diagnosed with the 1990 ACR fibromyalgia criteria ([4])? Because treatment of incomplete forms of fibromyalgia (chronic widespread pain and chronic regional pain) is usually identical with that of fibromyalgia ([7]), diagnostic criteria are useful in a conference presentation and/or in the writing of articles ([8]), but not in clinical practice. However, if fibromyalgia diagnosed with new criteria is considerably different from fibromyalgia diagnosed with old criteria, it is a great problem in studies of fibromyalgia.

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