In Situ Characterization of Internal Damage in TRIP-Steel/Mg-PSZ Composites under Compressive Stress Using X-Ray Computed Tomography

Authors

  • Harry Berek,

    Corresponding author
    1. Technical University Mining Academy Freiberg, Institute for Ceramics Glass- and Construction-Materials, Agricolastraße 17, 09599 Freiberg, (Germany)
    • Technical University Mining Academy Freiberg, Institute for Ceramics Glass- and Construction-Materials, Agricolastraße 17, 09599 Freiberg, (Germany)
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  • Uta Ballaschk,

    1. Technical University Mining Academy Freiberg, Institute for Ceramics Glass- and Construction-Materials, Agricolastraße 17, 09599 Freiberg, (Germany)
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  • Christos G. Aneziris

    1. Technical University Mining Academy Freiberg, Institute for Ceramics Glass- and Construction-Materials, Agricolastraße 17, 09599 Freiberg, (Germany)
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  • The authors would like to thank the German Science Foundation (DFG) for supporting the investigation in the frame of the collaborative research centre TRIP matrix composites (SFB799). Special thanks are given to Mr. M. Hasterok for providing the samples.

Abstract

An experimental setup for in situ investigations under compressive stress using laboratory X-ray computed tomography (XCT) was developed and successfully tested. Complete deformation curves can be taken. It could be shown that XCT scans are possible during brakes of the stopped in situ experiments. In this way the deformation behavior of defined sample regions can be investigated. This kind of experiments is well suited to investigate the deformation behavior of foams and other samples which are transferable for the X-rays used. The compression of metal matrix composite foams lead to the cooperative collapse of connected cells. We observed deformation bands arising in regions of smaller cell wall thicknesses. The deformation was dependent on size, shape, and orientation of the cells under consideration. Obviously deformation bands start at bigger cells with a small cell wall thickness and some extension perpendicular to the deformation direction. The rising of this kind of deformation bands can be explained by the dramatic change of the stress distribution in the neighbor cells after the first brake of a cell wall.

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