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Lithography-Based Additive Manufacturing of Cellular Ceramic Structures

Authors

  • Ruth Felzmann,

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute of Materials Science and Technology Vienna University of Technology Favoritenstrasse 9-11/E308, 1040 Vienna, Austria
    • Institute of Materials Science and Technology Vienna University of Technology Favoritenstrasse 9-11/E308, 1040 Vienna, Austria.
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  • Simon Gruber,

    1. Institute of Materials Science and Technology Vienna University of Technology Favoritenstrasse 9-11/E308, 1040 Vienna, Austria
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  • Gerald Mitteramskogler,

    1. Institute of Materials Science and Technology Vienna University of Technology Favoritenstrasse 9-11/E308, 1040 Vienna, Austria
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  • Passakorn Tesavibul,

    1. Institute of Materials Science and Technology Vienna University of Technology Favoritenstrasse 9-11/E308, 1040 Vienna, Austria
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  • Aldo R. Boccaccini,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Biomaterials, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Cauerstr. 6, 91058 Erlangen, Germany
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  • Robert Liska,

    1. Institute of Applied Synthetic Chemistry, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/E163, 1060 Vienna, Austria
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  • Jürgen Stampfl

    1. Institute of Materials Science and Technology Vienna University of Technology Favoritenstrasse 9-11/E308, 1040 Vienna, Austria
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  • We gratefully acknowledge the financial support by the European Commission under grant FP7-260043 PHOCAM.

Abstract

Lithography-based additive manufacturing technology is a layered manufacturing approach where liquid photopolymerizable resins are solidified with ultraviolet, visible, or infrared light. Using a system based on digital mirror devices, photopolymers can be exposed selectively in order to build parts with defined geometries. By modifying the system with a rotating building platform, suspensions with a high solid loading of ceramic powders can be processed, despite the high viscosity of these resins. Depending on the field of application, various formulations were developed for fabricating customized ceramic parts made of alumina, tricalcium phosphate, or bioactive glasses, respectively. On the one hand the influence of the ceramic filler on the mechanical properties is characterized, on the other hand the good precision and the high surface quality of the process system is discussed. For alumina filled resins a solid loading of 50 vol% was used to obtain fully dense parts (>99% of theoretical density) with high fracture strength (biaxial strength of 516 MPa).

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