Ceramic Mask-Assisted Flame Spray Pyrolysis for Direct and Accurate Patterning of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

Authors

  • Torben Halfer,

    1. University of Bremen, Advanced Ceramics, Am Biologischen Garten 2, 28359 Bremen, Germany
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    • These two authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Huanjun Zhang,

    1. Department of Production Engineering, Foundation Institute of Materials Science (IWT), University of Bremen, Badgasteinerstraße 3, 28359 Bremen, Germany
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    • These two authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Lutz Mädler,

    1. Department of Production Engineering, Foundation Institute of Materials Science (IWT), University of Bremen, Badgasteinerstraße 3, 28359 Bremen, Germany
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  • Kurosch Rezwan

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Bremen, Advanced Ceramics, Am Biologischen Garten 2, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    • University of Bremen, Advanced Ceramics, Am Biologischen Garten 2, 28359 Bremen, Germany
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  • H.Z. and L.M. would like to thank the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) for funding this project within the Research Training Group 1375 “Nonmetallic Porous Structures for Physical–Chemical Functions” and L.M. thanks DFG for funding and MA 33332. The support from the University of Bremen under the Initiative “Func-Band” is also gratefully acknowledged. T.H. and K.R. thank Gerrit Dumstorff (Institute for Micro Sensors – Actuators and Systems (IMSAS), University of Bremen) for producing the patterned Si wafers. Petra Witte (Department of Geosciences, University of Bremen) is gratefully acknowledged for the assistance in the SEM and EDX investigation. Dr. Laura Treccani (Advanced Ceramic, University of Bremen) for her help and discussion.

  • Supporting Information is available from the Wiley Online Library or from the author.

Abstract

original image

The ceramic mask-assisted flame spray pyrolysis (CMA-FSP) is a method for creating accurate micron sized spots of different shapes by depositing of metal oxide nanoparticles directly onto user defined substrates. The patterning process uses free-standing alumina thin films with well-defined holes as reusable ceramic masks.

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