Advanced Engineering Materials

Cover image for Vol. 10 Issue 12

December, 2008

Volume 10, Issue 12

Pages 1075–1155, B61–B76

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Research News
    5. Communications
    6. Inside Front Cover
    7. Communications
    1. Cover Picture: EBSD Technique Visualization of Material Flow in Aluminum to Steel Friction-stir Dissimilar Welding (Adv. Eng. Mater. 12/2008)

      R. S. Coelho, A. Kostka, J. dos Santos and A. R. Pyzalla

      Version of Record online: 8 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200990000

      The Cover shows EBSD-related work (montage of inverse pole figure maps) conducted to visualize material flow, texture development and recrystallization in aluminum to steel friction-stir dissimilar welding. More details can be found in the article by R. S. Coelho et al. on page 1127 of this issue.

  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Research News
    5. Communications
    6. Inside Front Cover
    7. Communications
  3. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Research News
    5. Communications
    6. Inside Front Cover
    7. Communications
    1. Intensive Interstitial Strengthening of Stainless Steels (pages 1083–1093)

      H. Berns, V. Gavriljuk and B. Shanina

      Version of Record online: 8 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200800214

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Combined alloying with carbon plus nitrogen increases the concentration of free electrons in stainless steels which enhances the ductile metallic character of interatomic bounding, raises the interstitial solubility via short range atomic ordering and stabilises the austenitic phase of martensitic and austenitic grades. A (C+N) content of up to about 1 mass% entails an intensive interstitial strengthening which is suited for certain applications.

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Research News
    5. Communications
    6. Inside Front Cover
    7. Communications
    1. Grain Refinement in Cast Ti-46Al-8Nb AND Ti-46Al-8Ta Alloys via Massive Transformation (pages 1095–1100)

      V. Imayev, T. Khismatullin, T. Oleneva, R. Imayev, R. Valiev, R. Wunderlich, A. Minkow, U. Hecht and H.-J. Fecht

      Version of Record online: 8 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200800159

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Grain refinement in cast Ti-46Al-8Nb and Ti-46Al-8Ta alloys produced via heat treatment using massive transformation has been investigated using SEM and X-ray diffraction analysis. The massive transformation technique was confirmed to be an appropriate method for breaking down coarse grained structures, at least in small-sized sample bars. Some critical issues related to the massive transformation technique were identified and discussed.

    2. Formability of Accumulative Roll Bonded Aluminum AA1050 and AA6016 Investigated Using Bulge Tests (pages 1101–1109)

      I. Topic, H. W. Höppel, D. Staud, M. Merklein, M. Geiger and M. Göken

      Version of Record online: 8 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200800167

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The paper reports one of the very first attempts to investigate the formability of ultrafine-grained aluminum sheets produced by a severe plastic deformation process known as accumulative roll bonding. During hydraulic bulge testing the samples showed a tendency to higher achievable burst pressures and/or von Mises equivalent strains with increasing number of accumulative roll bonding cycles, indicating promising deformation behaviour and good formability.

    3. Orientation Design for Enhancing Deformation Twinning in Cu Single Crystal Subjected to Equal Channel Angular Pressing (pages 1110–1113)

      W. Han, S. Wu, C. Huang, S. Li and Z. Zhang

      Version of Record online: 9 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200800131

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Slip and twinning are two major mechanisms in plastic deformation of crystalline materials; however, twinning is extremely difficult to occur in face-centered-cubic crystals under conventional conditions. The authors show that twinning becomes an active deformation mode in copper single crystal when subjected to equal channel angular pressing at room temperature. In particular, the observations revealed that deformation twinning became more active in the copper single crystal having a proper crystallographic orientation.

    4. Effect of Nano-Scale Precipitates Growth on the Deformation Behavior of the Cast Coarse-Grained Al-Cu Alloy (pages 1114–1116)

      W. Zhao, H. Wang, J. Wang, D. Yao, H. Zhao and Q. Jiang

      Version of Record online: 3 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200800150

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In the present study, it is observed that the modified cast Al-Cu alloy (coarse-grained alloy) exhibits the following behavior, i.e., higher ductility at the lower strain rates. The nano-scale precipitates growth phenomenon under the deformation process is mainly responsible for the enhanced ductility at the lower strain rates. Besides, the strain rate sensitivity is due to dislocation effect in the present alloy at the higher strain rates.

    5. Propagation and Deflection of Shear Bands in Metallic Glass under Circumferential Constraint (pages 1117–1121)

      J. T. Fan, Z. F. Zhang, S. X. Mao and J. Eckert

      Version of Record online: 8 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200800162

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Small punch test is employed to investigate the deformation behavior of monolithic metallic glasses. Two parameters about prohibitive ability, PL and Pα, are proposed to describe the propagation and deflection of shear bands. A stress model is set up to explore the intrinsic physical interest. Based on the study, it is suggested that strengthening the surface should control the shear bands, and toughen metallic glasses with high strength and plasticity.

    6. Investigation of the Mechanical Behavior of Open-Cell Ni Foams by Experimental and FEM Procedures (pages 1122–1126)

      N. Michailidis, F. Stergioudi, H. Omar and D. N. Tsipas

      Version of Record online: 8 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200800152

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Given the wide range of potential applications the study of the mechanical behavior of metal foams is considered imperative. The elastoplastic behavior of a Nickel open-cell foam is investigated under tension loads. X-ray tomography 2D images were used to determine the foam 3D structure in order to build a FE model simulating the micro-tension conditions of the foam.

    7. EBSD Technique Visualization of Material Flow in Aluminum to Steel Friction-stir Dissimilar Welding (pages 1127–1133)

      R. S. Coelho, A. Kostka, J. dos Santos and A. R. Pyzalla

      Version of Record online: 8 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200800227

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Based on extreme plastic deformation in the solid state, friction stir welding (FSW) has rapidly become an important process for joining dissimilar alloys. However, understanding of the mechanisms of microstructure formation and material flow of dissimilar joints are very complex and still remain limited or unclear. Here we present the application of EBSD-based orientation SEM microscopy as a powerful tool for material flow investigation providing both qualitative and quantitative information.

    8. Microstructure and Properties of SiC Honeycomb Structures (pages 1134–1140)

      D. Galsterer, N. Travitzky, T. Wolff and P. Greil

      Version of Record online: 3 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200800176

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this work, a novel processing route was used for fabrication of porous beta-SiC materials below 1450 °C. Honeycomb structures, based on Si, C and Al, were extruded and afterwards converted into SiC based ceramics at temperatures between 1050 °C and 1450 °C in Ar atmosphere. A conversion temperature below 1450 °C was applied due to the low melting point of the used Si-Al-alloy.

    9. Polymer-Derived Ceramics for Advanced Bearing Applications (pages 1141–1146)

      M. Steinau, N. Travitzky, J. Gegner, J. Hofmann and P. Greil

      Version of Record online: 8 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200800194

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Linear sliding and roller bearings are widely used in various industries like the food/pharma or semiconductor sector. Ceramic bearings, however, are still a niche product only, due to their high production costs. Polymer-derived ceramics, made out of polysiloxanes and inorganic fillers like MoSi2, FeSiCr, SiC and Al2O3 offer the opportunity for a cost efficient production of ceramic bearing components, using injection molding techniques.

    10. Improved Plasma Synthesis of Si-nanopowders by Quenching (pages 1147–1150)

      M. Leparoux, C. Schreuders and P. Fauchais

      Version of Record online: 3 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200800217

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cold gas quenching has been investigated and optimized for the synthesis of silicon nanoparticles using an inductively coupled plasma process. A high symmetry quenching device with a funnel leads to particles with a two times higher specific surface area compared to non-quenching conditions. Further decrease of the mean particle size down to 13 nm could be even achieved by quenching at a lower temperature position.

    11. MOF@PolyHIPEs (pages 1151–1155)

      M. G. Schwab, I. Senkovska, M. Rose, M. Koch, J. Pahnke, G. Jonschker and S. Kaskel

      Version of Record online: 8 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200800189

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A macroporous polyHIPE was used as a monolithic support to grow crystals of the metal-organic framework Cu3(btc)2 (btc = benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate) directly within the open-cell structure. Due to the creation of a microporous structure within a macroporous substrate, a material with a lung-like porous structure is obtained (see picture: SEM micrograph of Cu3(btc)2 crystals in polyHIPE).

  5. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Research News
    5. Communications
    6. Inside Front Cover
    7. Communications
  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Research News
    5. Communications
    6. Inside Front Cover
    7. Communications
    1. Osseointegration of Chemically Modified Titanium Surfaces: An in Vivo Study (pages B61–B66)

      C. von Wilmowsky, L. Müller, R. Lutz, U. Lohbauer, F. Rupp, F. W. Neukam, E. Nkenke, K. A. Schlegel and F. A. Müller

      Version of Record online: 8 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200800163

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this study we investigated the in vivo effects of a chemically modified bioactive titanium surface on peri-implant bone formation and compared it with an untreated titanium surface. We identified the importance of surface roughness, hydrophilicity, and surface chemistry of the implant surface and their influence on peri-implant bone formation. The results of this study demonstrate that the chemically modified bioactive titanium surface does enhance bone formation and osseointegration.

    2. 3D Powder Printing of β-Tricalcium Phosphate Ceramics Using Different Strategies (pages B67–B71)

      E. Vorndran, M. Klarner, U. Klammert, L. M. Grover, S. Patel, J. E. Barralet and U. Gbureck

      Version of Record online: 8 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200800179

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Custom made macroporous β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) bone substitutes were fabricated using 3D powder printing comparing three different preparation strategies. Samples fabricated using a novel hydraulic cement setting reaction showed the best printing resolution and highest mechanical performance. This method is a significant step forward in producing β-TCP monoliths by rapid prototyping and would decrease processing time for commercial fabrication due to their rapid hardening and ease of handling.

    3. Sample Geometry Influences the Outcome of in vitro Cytotoxicity Tests (pages B72–B76)

      M. Löbler, D. Behrend, R. Maletz and K.-P. Schmitz

      Version of Record online: 9 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200800106

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cytotoxicity of materials is tested in vitro according to standards detailed in ISO 10993. Since ISO 10993 allows a wide range of experimental conditions a material might be judged to be non cytotoxic or cytotoxic depending on the choice of sample geometry. Two cytotoxicity test systems were compared with each other. It is recommended that test conditions should be simplified in order to make cytotoxicity results more transparent.

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