Advanced Engineering Materials

Cover image for Vol. 10 Issue 3

Special Issue: Highly Porous Metals and Ceramics

March, 2008

Volume 10, Issue 3

Pages 147–261

Issue edited by: Paolo Colombo

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Book Review
    1. Cover Picture Adv. Eng. Mater. 3/2008

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200890006

      No abstract.

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Book Review
    1. Editorial (page 147)

      Paolo Colombo

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200890003

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Book Review
    1. Contents: Adv. Eng. Mater. 3/2008 (pages 149–153)

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200890004

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Book Review
    1. Freeze-Casting of Porous Ceramics: A Review of Current Achievements and Issues (pages 155–169)

      S. Deville

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200700270

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Freeze-casting of porous ceramics have seen a great deal of efforts during the last few years. The objective of this review is to provide a first understanding of the process as of today. This analysis highlights the current limits of both the understanding and the control of the process. A few perspectives are given, with regards of the current achievements, interests and identified issues.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Book Review
    1. High Pressure Integral Foam Moulding of Aluminium – Process Technology (pages 171–178)

      H. Wiehler, C. Körner and R. F. Singer

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200700267

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      The process technology for the production of net-shaped aluminium parts, which contain a foamed core surrounded by an integral solid skin, is presented. The process – an adaptation of processes used for the production of polymer integral foam parts – is realised on a pressure die-casting machine. The necessary changes in the sequence control of the pressure die-casting machine and the mould design are presented. The influence of different blowing agents and processing times on the foam structure are discussed.

    2. Fatigue of Metal Hollow Spheres Structures (pages 179–184)

      O. Caty, E. Maire and R. Bouchet

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200700265

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      Fatigue properties of three kinds of hollow metal spheres structures were determined in compression/compression. These results were completed with a fatigue damage process study by ex-situ X-ray tomography and a finite element simulation using tomographic 3D images. All these data permitted to understand the chronology of damage in the structure. The difference in behaviour of the three kinds of materials is mainly explained by the process root used (brazing and sintering) and by the nature of the constitutive material.

    3. Behaviour of Syntactic and Partial Hollow Sphere Structures under Dynamic Loading (pages 185–191)

      M. Vesenjak, T. Fiedler, Z. Ren and A. Öchsner

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200700325

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      The paper investigates the macroscopic behaviour of adhesively bonded metallic hollow sphere structures fully and partially embedded within an adhesive matrix subjected to compressive dynamic loading by means of computational simulations. Different influences e.g. morphology, topology, sphere wall thickness and strain rate sensitivity have been analyzed.

    4. Ferrous Fibre Network Materials for Jet Noise Reduction in Aeroengines Part I: Acoustic Effects (pages 192–200)

      I. O. Golosnoy, J. C. Tan and T. W. Clyne

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200700302

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      An investigation is presented into the acoustic effects of introducing tubular modules, made of highly porous ferrous materials, into the exhaust region of a gas turbine engine. It is shown that substantial reductions in noise level (up to ∼10 dB) can be achieved, at constant thrust. Such effects can arise both via modification to the gas flow field (and hence to noise generation characteristics) and by attenuation of acoustic waves within the modules.

    5. Ferrous Fibre Network Materials for Jet Noise Reduction in Aeroengines Part II: Thermo-Mechanical Stability (pages 201–209)

      J. C. Tan and T. W. Clyne

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200700303

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      This paper describes an investigation into the thermo-mechanical stability of highly porous fibre network materials, proposed for use in the exhaust containment region of gas turbine aeroengines, in order to generate acoustic damping. The materials studied are (grade 304) stainless steel single fibres and sintered fibre networks, with relative densities of 5, 10 and 15 %. A network density of about 10 % is identified as offering an optimal combination of thermo-mechanical stability in the environment concerned and effective acoustic damping (see Part I).

    6. Optimisation of Metallic Fibre Network Materials for Compact Heat Exchangers (pages 210–218)

      I. O. Golosnoy, A. Cockburn and T. W. Clyne

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200800021

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new model is presented for simulation of the operation of a heat exchanger, based on a core of metallic fibre network material. It is shown that predictions are consistent with experimental data, obtained using air as the heat exchange fluid. The model can be used in designing the architecture of such materials and it is shown that there are optimal ranges for the fibre volume fraction and the fibre diameter.

    7. Novel Manufacturing Process for Metal and Ceramic Microhoneycombs (pages 219–222)

      L. Tuchinskiy

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200700268

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      A novel low-cost manufacturing process allows production of honeycombs of various customized shapes from metals, ceramics and composites with the channel diameters from 50 microns to several millimeters. Such microhoneycombs can be used for production of high efficiency heat sinks, heat pipes, miniaturized heat exchangers, cryogenic regenerators, fuel reformers and many other microchannel devices.

    8. Dip-coating of Fibrous Natural Materials for Alumina Tube Manufacturing (pages 223–226)

      S. Gaydardzhiev, V. Wilker and M. Scheffler

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200700269

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hollow ceramic microtubes have been prepared by dip-coating of fibrous plants with water based alumina gel-casting slurries using hemp and coconut fibres as templates. Good correlation between the diameters of the template fibres and the resulting channels have been found. Hemp fibres used as bundles have lead to the formation of multi channel patterns (see figure) and the coconut fibres-templated process resulted in uniform monochannel materials. The micro tubes show good mechanical handling.

    9. A New Oxidation Protection Strategy for Silicon Carbide Foams (pages 227–234)

      H.-P. Martin, G. Standke and J. Adler

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200700271

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      This paper describes the manufacture of an oxidation protection layer for reticulated silicon carbide foams. The produced foams are investigated by light microscopy, XRD and electrical measurements. The protection efficiency is estimated by weight change, image analysis and electrical resistance. The results indicate a feasible way to protect SiC foams against oxidation.

    10. Water 1H NMR Technique to Analyse the Porous Structure of Ceramics (pages 235–240)

      M. Gombia, P. Fantazzini, E. Rambaldi, A. Tucci, L. Esposito and G. Timellini

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200700272

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Magnetic Resonance Relaxometry (MRR) and Imaging (MRI) of water 1H nuclei provide a striking and useful complement to conventional methods for showing pore structure in ceramics and the response to different soaking times and to different compositions.

    11. Synthesis and Properties of Porous Hybrid Materials containing Metallic Nanoparticles (pages 241–245)

      M. Wilhelm, M. Adam, M. Bäumer and G. Grathwohl

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200800019

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Highly microporous hybrid materials with embedded Ni or Pt nanoparticles were prepared by pyrolytic conversion of polysiloxane – metal salt precursors and characterised in terms of surface area, sorption behaviour of water and n-heptane, size and accessibility of metallic nanoparticles. Upon varying the amount of polysiloxanes carrying non-polar and polar organic groups in the precursors the surface properties of hybrid materials could be altered from strongly hydrophobic to mainly hydrophilic. The size of metallic nanoparticles was influenced by the metal content and the presence of non-reductive phenyl polysiloxane. In case of Pt, very small sizes in the nanometer regime (2–4 nm) could be obtained. During CO oxidation Pt containing ceramers showed high catalytic activity.

    12. Porous Titanium Coatings Obtained by Electrophoretic Deposition (EPD) of Pickering Emulsions and Microwave Sintering (pages 246–249)

      B. Neirinck, T. Mattheys, A. Braem, J. Fransaer, O. Van der Biest and J. Vleugels

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200700273

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Porous titanium coatings on dense Ti6Al4V substrates were made by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of titanium particle stabilized Pickering emulsions. The samples were consecutively dried and microwave sintered in helium to prevent oxidation. The obtained coatings have a thickness ranging from 50 to 250 μm with open spherical macropores in the 20 to 200 μm range.

    13. Correlation Between Elastic Modulus, Shear Modulus, Poisson's Ratio and Porosity in Porous Materials (pages 250–252)

      J. Kováčik

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200700266

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      Prediction of porous materials mechanical properties is crucial for their industrial applications. Now numerical models containing some errors or analytical semi-empirical models are used. Percolation theory model is suitable to describe porosity dependence of Young‘s and shear modulus and Poisson‘s ratio over whole porosity range as it includes critical porosity. Moreover, it is able to explain Poisson‘s ratio porosity independence as well its decrease with increased porosity (see Fig).

    14. The Manufacture of Porous Ceramics Using Supercritical Fluid Technology (pages 253–255)

      S. Matthews and J. Matthews

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200700306

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      Supercritical fluid-assisted technology has been combined with conventional polymer processing techniques, such as injection moulding and extrusion to manufacture porous ceramics components. This paper introduces the new process and highlights one of the key benefits of this technique; the ability to control the porous network formed. It was found that by altering the binder formulation and processing conditions the pore size, pore type and pore density could be controlled.

    15. A Direct Method for the Fabrication of Macro-Porous SiOC Ceramics from Preceramic Polymers (pages 256–259)

      C. Vakifahmetoglu and P. Colombo

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200700330

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      Cellular SiOC ceramics having a complex morphology were produced using two silicone precursors. Linear PDMS and two different silsesquioxanes (containing either methyl or methyl-phenyl side groups) were mixed, crosslinked and pyrolyzed at 1200 °C, resulting in the formation of macroporous ceramic components. Pore formation was attributed to the different behavior of the precursors upon pyrolysis. The amount of porosity depended on the amount of PDMS, which acted as a “sacrificial filler”, leading to the formation of pores ranging from a few microns to a few hundred microns.

  6. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Book Review

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