Advanced Engineering Materials

Cover image for Vol. 11 Issue 10

October 2009

Volume 11, Issue 10

Pages 759–861, B137–B168

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    1. Adv. Eng. Mater. 10/2009

      Kun Yan, Klaus-Dieter Liss, Ulf Garbe, John Daniels, Oliver Kirstein, Huijun Li and Rian Dippenaar

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200990026

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Evolution in orientation space of copper upon plastic deformation showing the development of coarse grains into texture as measured with synchrotron high energy X-rays. The color coded intensity distribution on the 111 Debye-Scherrer ring is plotted as a function of azimuthal angle and time respectively along the horizontal and vertical axis. The background image is mirrored vertically and the insert shows the same data in 3D looking backwards in time. A logarithmic intensity scale has been chosen. See the article by K. D. Liss, p. 771.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    1. Adv. Eng. Mater. 10/2009

      Zhi-Min Dang, Chun-Yan Tian, Jun-Wei Zha, Sheng-Hong Yao, Yu-Juan Xia, Jian-Ying Li, Chang-Yong Shi and Jinbo Bai

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200990027

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      When the BT nanoparticles are also embedded into the polymer, the surface charges of the three-phase (BT-HA)/PVDF nanocomposites would be formed after an electrical field is applied on them because the BT particles can be polarized easily [See Picture (a)]. The surface charges or the static electric field [See Picture (b)] from the surface charges would accelerate the bone regeneration significantly. Therefore, the time for bone-regeneration of the three-phase (BT-HA)/PVDF nanocomposites would be shorten than that of the two-phase HA/PVDF nanocomposites, and the effect on bone regeneration would be much better. Namely, the HA can enhance osteoblast differentiation as well as osteoblast growth while the surface charges from the BT polarization can further encourage those actions of HA in our three-phase (BT-HA)/PVDF nanocomposites with high permittivity [See Picture (c)]. See article by Z.-M. Dang, p. B144.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    1. Contents: (Adv. Eng. Mater. 10/2009) (pages 759–764)

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200990028

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    1. The “Ductilities” in Single Phase Steels from Usual to Nanoscale Microstructures (pages 767–770)

      Olivier Bouaziz

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900112

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The control and the improvement of the ductility of nanostructured structural steels is one of the key challenges in assessing the technological viability of this metallurgical strategy. In the present reviw, it is shown that more rigorous definitions of the ductility are required in order to avoid possible confusions. After this preliminary work, a more transparent analysis is done concerning the effect of the microstructural scale showing clearly the weaknesses and the strengths of ultra-fine single phase steels.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    1. From Single Grains to Texture (pages 771–773)

      Kun Yan, Klaus-Dieter Liss, Ulf Garbe, John Daniels, Oliver Kirstein, Huijun Li and Rian Dippenaar

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900163

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The evolution of embedded bulk grains of polycrystalline copper is followed in situ and in real time during the plastic deformation process of uniaxial cold compression. Initially, coarse grains break up into subgrains and, depending on their initial alignment, rotate into their preferred orientation merging finally into a continuous texture.

    2. Size and Geometry Effects on Flow Stress in Bioinspired de novo Metal-matrix Nanocomposites (pages 774–781)

      Dipanjan Sen and Markus J. Buehler

      Article first published online: 26 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900125

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The figure shows a centrosymmetry analysis of the dislocation and defect structure in the metallic nanocomposite as obtained from molecular dynamics simulations, emphasizing the slipped regions during initial plasticity. The black region depicts the location of the hard platelet embedded in a soft matrix.

    3. Superplastic Behavior in Mg[BOND]Zn[BOND]Y Alloy with Dispersed Quasicrystal Phase Particles (pages 782–787)

      Hidetoshi Somekawa, Alok Singh and Toshiji Mukai

      Article first published online: 26 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900110

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An Mg[BOND]Zn[BOND]Y alloy with a dispersion of quasicrystal phase particles showed low-temperature superplastic behavior, and the dominant deformation process was grain boundary sliding. Observations of the deformed microstructure showed that the quasicrystal phase particles were an obstacle to dislocation movements; the kinetics of the superplastic behavior were lower than those of a conventional magnesium alloy. This alloy also demonstrated a high possibility for secondary forming – i.e., superplastic forging.

    4. Microstructure and Mechanical Performance of Brand-New Al0.3CrFe1.5MnNi0.5 High-Entropy Alloys (pages 788–794)

      Wei-Yeh Tang, Ming-Hao Chuang, Hsuan-You Chen and Jien-Wei Yeh

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900135

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The microstructure, hardening behavior, and adhesive wear behavior of Al0.3CrFe1.5MnNi0.5 high-entropy alloys were investigated. All alloys exhibit superior adhesive wear resistance to cast iron FC-300, bearing steel SUJ-2, and hot-mold steel SKD-61. The superior wear resistance of the alloys is attributable to the formation of ρ phase during the furnace cooling from the homogenization at 1100 °C or the in situ formation of the ρphase induced by the high interface temperature and severe plastic deformation during wear sliding.

    5. Direct Laser Interference Structuring as a Tool to Gradually Tune the Wetting Response of Titanium and Polyimide Surfaces (pages 795–800)

      Michael Hans, Carsten Gachot, Frank Müller and Frank Mücklich

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900115

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Direct laser interference structuring has been used for topographical surface design on titanium and polyimide. The wetting response of processed materials showed a roughness-dependant increase in contact angle starting at initially hydrophilic conditions.

    6. Mass Fabrication of Small Cell Spheroids by Using Micro-patterned Tissue Culture Plate (pages 801–804)

      Akinari Iwasaki, Takuya Matsumoto, Go Tazaki, Hitoshi Tsuruta, Hiroshi Egusa, Hiroyuki Miyajima and Taiji Sohmura

      Article first published online: 25 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200800392

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A newly designed micro-patterned chamber was utilized to fabricate cell spheroids with a constant size (<200 μm) and cell number. By applying cytochalasin D as a chemical to control cell adhesion and aggregation, thousands of aggregated cells were formed in each patterned chamber. Importantly, the formed cell spheroids were collected by a simple pipetting process without using proteinase.

    7. Microstructure and Transport Properties of Cellular Materials: Representative Volume Element (pages 805–810)

      Emmanuel Brun, Jerome Vicente, Frédéric Topin, René Occelli and Michael J. Clifton

      Article first published online: 12 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900131

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The representative volume element (RVE) plays a central role in efforts to predict the effective thermo-physical and transport properties of heterogeneous materials. A quantitative definition of its size is proposed in this work. It is shown that RVE depends on the morphological or physical property being investigated. The methodology is applied to real samples of open-celled materials (such as metallic foam) whose structure is obtained from X-Ray microtomography.

    8. Heat Transfer in Polypropylene-Based Foams Produced Using Different Foaming Processes (pages 811–817)

      Marcelo Antunes, José Ignacio Velasco, Vera Realinho, Antonio B. Martínez, Miguel-Ángel Rodríguez-Pérez and José Antonio de Saja

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900129

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This paper presents the characterization of the cellular structure and thermal conduction behaviour of polypropylene foams produced using different foaming processes, with the aim of selecting the best possible PP foam thermal insulator. Thermal conductivity results have shown that the global heat transfer behaviour is controlled by the relative density. For relative densities higher than 0.2, thermal conductivity differences were insignificant, the data being predicted by the mixture's rule and Russell's model. In the low density range, all of the proposed models underestimated the overall conductivity, the effect of the processing method being more significant, slight differences being observed between foams produced by extrusion and those produced by gas dissolution with higher cell sizes and anisotropies. Foams with finer cellular structures showed to be better insulating materials.

    9. Influence of Solid Phase Conductivity and Cellular Structure on the Heat Transfer Mechanisms of Cellular Materials: Diverse Case Studies (pages 818–824)

      Eusebio Solórzano, Miguel Angel Rodriguez-Perez, Jaine Lázaro and José Antonio de Saja

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900138

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An analysis on the influence of solid phase thermal conductivity and cellular structure on the heat transfer mechanisms (HTMs) by means of studding diverse case studies combining theoretical and experimental data. The radiation and conduction mechanisms have been analyzed for cellular materials based on insulating and conductive matrixes using similar concepts and models for both types of materials.

    10. Heat Transport in Closed Cell Aluminum Foams: Application Notes (pages 825–831)

      Jaime Lázaro, Javier Escudero, Eusebio Solórzano, Miguel A. Rodríguez-Pérez and José A. de Saja

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900140

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Heat transport equations have been used to solve, by implementing the Finite Element Method (FEM), three different cases representative of the aluminium foams life: the production process (solidification in the molten state), post-production (water quenching heat treatments) and applications (fire barriers).

    11. Numerical Modelling of Flow Boiling Heat Transfer in Horizontal Metal-Foam Tubes (pages 832–836)

      Wei Lu and Chang-Ying Zhao

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900139

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The flow boiling heat transfer performance in horizontal metal-foam tubes is numerically investigated based on the flow pattern map retrieved from experimental investigations. The porous media non-equilibrium heat transfer model is employed for modelling both vapour and liquid phase zones. The modelling predictions have been compared with the experimental results, as shown in the figure below.

    12. Heat-Transfer Coefficient for Cellular Materials Modelled as an Array of Elliptic Rods (pages 837–842)

      Marcelo J. S. de Lemos and Marcelo B. Saito

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900130

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Convective heat-transfer coefficients in foam-like materials, modelled as an array of elliptic rods, are numerically determined. An incompressible fluid is considered, flowing through an infinite foam-like material with an arbitrary solid temperature. A repetitive cell is identified and periodic boundary conditions are applied. Turbulence is handled with both low and high Reynolds number formulations. The interfacial heat-transfer coefficient is obtained by volume integrating the distributed variables obtained within the cell. The results indicate that, for the same mass-flow rate, materials formed by elliptic rods have a lower interfacial heat-transfer coefficient compared to other media modelled as staggered arrays of square rods.

    13. Lattice Monte Carlo and Experimental Analyses of the Thermal Conductivity of Random-Shaped Cellular Aluminum (pages 843–847)

      Thomas Fiedler, Eusebio Solórzano, Francisco Garcia-Moreno, Andreas Öchsner, Irina V. Belova and Graeme E. Murch

      Article first published online: 25 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900132

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The effective thermal conductivity of open- and closed-cell aluminium foams with stochastic pore morphologies has been determined by numerical, analytical and experimental methods. A three dimensional analysis technique has been used where numerical calculation models are generated based on 3D computed tomographic (CT) reconstructions. The resulting three dimensional grid models are used for thermal Lattice Monte Carlo (LMC) analyses. The second part of this paper addresses experimental measurements of open-cell M-pore® and closed-cell Alporas® cellular aluminium. Finally, results obtained using both approaches are compared to classical analytic predictions.

    14. The Uncertainty in SCHF-DT Thermal Conductivity Measurements of Lotus-Type Porous Copper (pages 848–851)

      Hiroshi Chiba, Tetsuro Ogushi, Hideo Nakajima, Shunkichi Ueno, Kahoru Torii and Toshio Tomimura

      Article first published online: 30 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900133

      In order to use lotus-type porous copper effectively as a heat sink, it is important to know the effective thermal conductivity considering the effect of pores on heat conduction in the material. So far, the effective thermal conductivity of lotus-type porous copper has been measured by using specimens of different thickness (the SCHF-DT method). In this paper, the uncertainty in the effective thermal conductivity of a specimen measured using this method was evaluated by comparison between numerical analysis and current experimental data.

    15. Combined Analytical and Phonon-Tracking Approaches to Model Thermal Conductivity of Etched and Annealed Nanoporous Silicon (pages 852–861)

      Jaona Randrianalisoa and Dominique Baillis

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900136

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A combination of analytical and phonon-tracking approaches is proposed to predict thermal conductivity of porous nanostructured thick materials. The analytical approach derives the thermal conductivity as function of the intrinsic properties of the material and properties characterizing the phonon interaction with pore walls.

    16. Correlation of Ultrastructure with Mechanical Properties of Nano-Hybrid Dental Composites (pages B137–B143)

      Lena Schmitt, Claudia Lurtz, Katrin Sternberg, Axel Haubold, Klaus-Peter Schmitz and Detlef Behrend

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200800367

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Determination of mechanical properties of nano-hybrid dental composites leads to strong correlation to material's ultrastructure. Not only does total filler content in percentage of weight affect the mechanical properties, but the combination of optimal filler size and shape with homogeneous distribution of filler particles and an optimal amount of different sized fillers in finally cured dental composites lead to desired mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties.

    17. Potential Bioelectroactive Bone Regeneration Polymer Nanocomposites with High Dielectric Permittivity (pages B144–B147)

      Zhi-Min Dang, Chun-Yan Tian, Jun-Wei Zha, Sheng-Hong Yao, Yu-Juan Xia, Jian-Ying Li, Chang-Yong Shi and Jinbo Bai

      Article first published online: 25 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900085

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The frequency dependence of the dielectric permittivity of (barium titanate–hydroxyapatite)/poly(vinylidene fluoride) three-phase nanocomposites is investigated at room temperature and different fractions of barium titanate. The permittivity increases with increasing concentration of barium titanate. A weak decrease in permittivity is also observed for frequencies below 106 Hz. The SEM image inset in a dielectric permittivity vs. frequency curve shows that rod-like hydroxyapatite and sphere-like barium titanate nanoparticles exist in the three-phase nanocomposites.

    18. PE-UHMW in Hip Implants: Properties of Conventional and Crosslinked Prosthetic Components (pages B148–B154)

      Ruth Markut-Kohl, Vasiliki-Maria Archodoulaki, Sabine Seidler and Gobert Skrbensky

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900050

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hip implants made of crosslinked ultra high molecular weight polyethylene—PE-UHMW—(different as-received conditions) are compared with a retrieval made from non-crosslinked PE-UHMW and a control PE-UHMW. Oxidation leads to recrystallization and the enhanced crystallinity corresponds to higher hardness values. These structure-property relations are discussed for conventional PE-UHMW and also for crosslinked material.

    19. A New Approach for Adipose Tissue Regeneration Based on Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Contact to Hydrogels—an In Vitro Study (pages B155–B161)

      Kirsten Peters, Achim Salamon, Sandra Van Vlierberghe, Joachim Rychly, Michael Kreutzer, Hans-Georg Neumann, Etienne Schacht and Peter Dubruel

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200800379

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this study an approach for adipose tissue regeneration based on human mesenchymal stem cells and hydrogels as supporting matrix was evaluated. The gelatin-based hydrogels developed in this study were cytocompatible and stem cell adhesion onto hydrogel surfaces was higher as compared to tissue culture polystyrene. Furthermore, the adipogenic differentiation degree was increased. These results are promising for future applications of hydrogels in adipose tissue regeneration strategies.

    20. Bioactive and Degradable Composite Microparticulates for the Tissue Cell Population and Osteogenic Development (pages B162–B168)

      Hye-Sun Yu, Seok-Jung Hong, Jeong-Hui Park, Ishik Jeong and Hae-Won Kim

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900106

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bioactive and degradable composite microspheres (bioactive glass–synthetic biopolymer) were produced to deliver tissue cells and to aid their osteogenic development targeted for hard tissues. Cellular population (left, SEM cell image at day 3) and osteoblastic differentiation (right, immunofluorescence staining with bone marker at day 14) on the microspheres was evident, suggesting the composite microspheres provided effective 3D substrate conditions for hard tissue regeneration.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION