Advanced Engineering Materials

Cover image for Vol. 11 Issue 11

November, 2009

Volume 11, Issue 11

Pages 867–944, B169–B226

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    1. Adv. Eng. Mater. 11/2009

      Silke Blindow, Maxim Pulkin, Dietmar Koch, Georg Grathwohl and Kurosch Rezwan

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200990029

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      The cover shows detection of collagen I in MG-63 cells grown on HA-fc04Si after 1, 3 and 7 days. The upper row shows the entire 3fold-staining; the row beneath shows the staining of collagen I, only. More details can be found in the article of K. Rezwan et al., page 875.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    1. Adv. Eng. Mater. 11/2009

      Jörg Reichert, Gang Wei and Klaus D. Jandt

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200990030

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover shows AFM image of fg adsorbed from PBS with protein concentration 3.0 mg mL−1. The white arrows indicate the nanosteps of the graphite planes and the topotactical orientation of the fg nanofibrils. More details can be found in the article by Jörg Reichert, Gang Wei and Klaus D. Jandt on page B177

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    1. Contents: (Adv. Eng. Mater. 11/2009) (pages 867–872)

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200990031

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    1. Hydroxyapatite/SiO2 Composites via Freeze Casting for Bone Tissue Engineering (pages 875–884)

      Silke Blindow, Maxim Pulkin, Dietmar Koch, Georg Grathwohl and Kurosch Rezwan

      Version of Record online: 30 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900208

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      Freeze casting is a fabrication method that allows producing near-net-shaped ceramics. Cell culture tests with human osteoblast-like cells (MG-63) revealed that HA/SiO2 composites feature improved properties toward cell proliferation and differentiation. Cell numbers and the expression of collagen I and osteocalcin were increased as compared to the HA reference without SiO2 addition. Smooth surfaces were found to enhance cell attachment and proliferation, while increasing the roughness (Ra = 5–6 μm) promoted the cell differentiation.

    2. High Strength (Ti58Ni28Cu8Si4Sn2)100−xMox Nanoeutectic Matrix–β-Ti Dendrite, BMG-Derived Composites with Enhanced Plasticity and Corrosion Resistance (pages 885–891)

      Hesham E. Khalifa and Kenneth S. Vecchio

      Version of Record online: 21 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900148

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      Semi-solidly processed(Ti58Ni28Cu8Si4Sn2)100−xMox nanoeutectic matrix composites utilize a ductile dendritic β-Ti phase to achieve enhanced plasticity up to 15% total strain while maintaining fracture strengths up to 2300 MPa. The choice of Mo as the β-Ti stabilizer plays an important role in enhancing the work hardening exponent as well as the corrosion resistance in these alloys.

    3. Oxidation Resistant Coatings for Ultrahigh Temperature Refractory Mo-Base Alloys (pages 892–897)

      John H. Perepezko and Ridwan Sakidja

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900118

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      The use of Mo base alloys is limited by severe oxidation above about 650 °C. While MoSi2 coatings offer protection at high temperature, they are ineffective at low temperature. An integrated coating design has been developed based upon (B + Si) co-deposition and an in-situ diffusion barrier that offers robust, long term oxidation protection and self-healing for Mo alloys over a wide temperature range to over 1600 °C.

    4. Transition of Failure Mode and Enhanced Plastic Deformation of Metallic Glass by Multiaxial Confinement (pages 898–901)

      Fu-Fa Wu, Zhe-Feng Zhang and Scott Xing-Yuan Mao

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900023

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      Multiple shear bands are formed in a confined metallic-glass specimen under small-punch loading. The intersecting of shear bands and the formation of profuse secondary shear bands are promoted under this confinement; accordingly, the failure mode changes from catastrophic fracture to stable multiple shear banding. Multiaxial confinement is an effective method to stabilize shear banding and further enhance the mechanical performance, especially the plastic deformation capability of metallic glass. These results present a simple step for making shear banding more stable and exploiting the shear-deformation capability of metallic glasses, leading to the toughening of brittle metallic glasses and potentially broadening their applications.

    5. Laser Bending of Aluminum Foam Sandwich Panels (pages 902–906)

      Alessandro Guglielmotti, Fabrizio Quadrini,, Erica Anna Squeo and Vincenzo Tagliaferri

      Version of Record online: 25 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900111

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      Aluminum foam sandwich panels were laser bent by means of a diode laser. Two panels different in thickness were used in bending tests; the effect of the main process parameters (laser power and scan velocity) on the bending efficiency was investigated as well as the contribution of the panel skin, and the protective gas. As a result, a very good formability was observed for the laser processed panels.

    6. Perfectly Ordered, Free-Standing Nanowire Arrays With Controllable Geometry (pages 907–911)

      Adam Philip Robinson, Gavin Burnell, Suman-Lata Sahonta and Judith MacManus-Driscoll

      Version of Record online: 12 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900150

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      We demonstrate a novel focused ion beam (FIB) based technique for the production of substrate-supported, free-standing, perfectly ordered nanowire arrays with control over the pore geometry, pitch, diameter, and length. A FIB may be used to influence the site of pore formation in ultra-thin (<1 µm) oxide nanoporous templates adhered to substrates. Electrodeposition through the template results in the production of nanowire arrays with controlled, perfect ordering.

    7. Solute Content and the Grain Microstructure of High Pressure Diecast Magnesium–Aluminium Alloys (pages 912–919)

      Anumalasetty V. Nagasekhar, Mark A. Easton and Carlos H. Cáceres

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900175

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      The grain microstructure is strongly bimodal due to the mixture of large dendritic grains that solidify in the shot sleeve and are subsequently injected into the die cavity, and the small grains that nucleate inside the cavity and grow to a size dictated by the solute content and the solidification rate. The large grains form only in concentrated alloys; their size is also partially controlled by the growth restriction factor.

    8. Environmental Behavior and Stress Corrosion Characteristics of Nano/Sub-Micron E950 Aluminum Alloy (pages 920–924)

      Eli Aghion and Inbar Guinguis

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900177

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      The corrosion performance and stress corrosion resistance of E950 Aluminum alloy with nano/sub-micron structure were evaluated in 3.5% NaCl solution. The results obtained indicated that the corrosion and stress corrosion resistance of E950 alloy were relatively reduced compared to that of the conventional coarse-grained alloy (Al–4.65%Mg). In particular, the inherently improved ultimate tensile strength of E950 alloy was significantly decreased under stress corrosion conditions.

    9. Tribological Studies of a Zr-Based Glass-Forming Alloy with Different States (pages 925–931)

      Feng Jiang, Jun Qu, Guojiang Fan, Wenhui Jiang, Dongchun Qiao, Matthew W. Freels, Peter K. Liaw and Hahn Choo

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900184

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      The tribological characteristics of a glass-forming alloy, Zr52.5Cu17.9Ni14.6Al10.0Ti5.0 (Vit 105), with different microstructural states have been investigated. The observed wear resistance in an ascending order is: the deformed, creep-tested, and as-cast states. Wear analyses suggested that the wear processes of glass-forming alloys involved abrasion, adhesion, and oxidation. The differences in hardness, free volume, and brittleness in different states significantly affected the friction and wear behaviors of the glass-forming alloys.

    10. In Situ Characterization of a Nb and Mo Containing γ-TiAl Based Alloy Using Neutron Diffraction and High-Temperature Microscopy (pages 932–937)

      Ian J. Watson, Klaus-Dieter Liss, Helmut Clemens, Wilfried Wallgram, Thomas Schmoelzer, Thomas C. Hansen and Mark Reid

      Version of Record online: 7 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900169

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      In recent times, novel titanium aluminides containing the bcc β-phase at high temperatures are being developed for improved hot-working capabilities, however, predictions of the phase diagrams are merely uncertain. Here, we present in situ neutron studies (Figure), which are particularly sensitive to the atomic disorder in the ordered phases. Complementary laser scanning confocal microscopy is employed for in situ microstructural investigations.

    11. Determination of Materials Selection Performance Indices Through the Combination of Numerical Modeling and Optimization Methods (pages 938–944)

      German Castillo, Hervé Wargnier, Michel Danis and Yves Brechet

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900159

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      In this paper a complete materials selection method is proposed. The method is applied to the constraints as well as the objectives, in order to carry out the filtration and classification stages at the same time. The study of the thermo mechanical behaviour of a machine tool frame has been used to demonstrate the validity of the proposed method.

    12. Reconstruction of a Rabbit Ulna Bone Defect Using Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and a PLA/β-TCP Composite by a Novel Sintering Method (pages B169–B176)

      Youngmee Jung, Min Sung Park, Sang-Soo Kim, Byung-Soo Kim, Young Ha Kim, Sang-Heon Kim, Jin Woo Lee and Soo Hyun Kim

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900013

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      We developed PLA/β-TCP composites with a novel sintering method in order to enhance cellular interaction with matrices for bone regeneration. Thereafter, we confirmed the superior bone-forming characteristics of PLA/β-TCP cell-composite constructs resulting from greater surface exposure of the β-TCP particles, which may yield higher osteogenic and osteoconductive properties.

    13. Formation and Topotactical Orientation of Fibrinogen Nanofibrils on Graphite Nanostructures (pages B177–B181)

      Jörg Reichert, Gang Wei and Klaus D. Jandt

      Version of Record online: 25 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900084

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      We studied the adsorption of human plasma fibrinogen and investigated the formation of amyloid-like fibrinogen nanofibrils and fibrinogen networks in the absence of thrombin and Ca·2+ with high resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM). We propose a possible mechanisms for the surface nanostructure mediated self assembly of fibrinogen molecules and the formation of fibrinogen nanofibrils and nanofibril networks in the absence of thrombin.

    14. Imaging of Cell-to-Material Interfaces by SEM after in situ Focused Ion Beam Milling on Flat Surfaces and Complex 3D-Fibrous Structures (pages B182–B188)

      Anne Greet Bittermann, Claus Burkhardt and Heike Hall

      Version of Record online: 30 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900080

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      Detailed analysis of the cell-to-implant interface needs to be performed prior to medical application. As these interfaces are often not accessible for direct visualization SEM after in situ focused ion beam milling was explored that allows selecting the regions of interest and serial sectioning for analysis of large scale implant architecture/topology down to detailed sub-cellular structures in one sample that might be very useful for (bio)material characterization.

    15. Anisotropic Behavior of Radiopaque NiTiPt Hypotube for Biomedical Applications (pages B189–B193)

      Zhicheng Lin, Hao-Ming Hsiao, David Mackiewicz, Boris Anukhin and Kelly Pike

      Version of Record online: 25 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200800403

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      This paper presents the first characterization of anisotropic stress–strain behavior in micron-sized specimens cut directly from hypotubes, the starting material for the manufacture of endovascular stents and other biomedical devices, of a new radiopaque alloy NiTiPt. Experimental results show that NiTiPt hypotube has very different anisotropic characteristics when compared to its NiTi counterpart including higher tensile strength and strain, higher stress–strain nonlinearity, smaller hysteresis loop, and sharper tails during loading–unloading.

    16. Hydroxyapatite/Bioactive Glass Films Produced by a Sol–Gel Method: In Vitro Behavior (pages B194–B199)

      Nihat C. Köseoğlu, Aligül Büyükaksoy, Ahmet Y. Oral and Muhammed H. Aslan

      Version of Record online: 25 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900034

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      A bioactive glass coating on hydroxyapatite (HA) films was found to promote apatite formation, leading to an apparent increase of in vitro apatite forming ability. Thus, the problems arising from the limited apatite forming ability of HA coatings on metals may be overcome by HA/bioactive glass coatings.

    17. Influence of TiO2 Nanoparticles Incorporated into Elastomeric Polyesters on their Biocompatibility In Vitro and In Vivo (pages B200–B203)

      Miroslawa El-Fray, Agnieszka Piegat and Piotr Prowans

      Version of Record online: 1 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900104

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      Soft poly(aliphatic/aromatic-ester) multiblock thermoplastic elastomers containing 0.2 wt.-% TiO2 nanoparticles are investigated. The addition of TiO2 nanoparticles enhanced cell proliferation and diminished the number of necrotic and apoptic cells. Implantation tests indicate that the observed tissue changes are similar to those observed with medical-grade silicone elastomer, no evidence of contact necrosis being observed.

    18. Bonding of a Silorane-Based Composite System to Bone (pages B204–B208)

      Xiaohong Wu and David C. Watts

      Version of Record online: 30 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900127

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      This work was to analyze by Weibull statistics the shear bond strength of a low-shrink Silorane-based composite system (SCS) to bone. The etching abilities of the adhesives were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. Results suggest that an effective and reliable bond to bone could be achieved by the SCS, showing the potential of this system to be used as a bone cement.

    19. Fabrication and Evaluation of Chitin-Based Nerve Guidance Conduits Used to Promote Peripheral Nerve Regeneration (pages B209–B218)

      Yumin Yang, Jian Wu, Xiaodong Wang, Jie Liu, Fei Ding and Xiaosong Gu

      Version of Record online: 16 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900120

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      Chitin product was prepared from the chitosan counterpart and both were found to be equally biocompatible with cultured Schwann cells. Chitin- and chitosan-based nerve guidance conduits (NGCs) were surgically implanted to bridge 10-mm-long neural defects in rat sciatic nerves. The regenerative outcome provided positive evidence that chitin- and chitosan-based NGCs produce the similar beneficial effects on peripheral nerve regeneration.

    20. Structural Evolution and Copper-Ion Release Behavior of Cu-pHEMA Hybrids Synthesized In Situ (pages B219–B226)

      Yen-Yu Liu, Tsan-Hua Tung, Kun-Ho Liu, San-Yuan Chen and Dean-Mo Liu

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200900142

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      A novel Cu-pHEMA hybrid is prepared by in-situ photopolymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) monomer in the presence of Cu(II) copper ions, following an in-situ chemical reduction. The metallic copper particles within the pHEMA network structure have a particle size ranging from 5 to 25 nm in diameter. A sustained release of cupric ions from the hybrids was measured for 10 days.

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