Advanced Engineering Materials

Cover image for Vol. 13 Issue 10

October, 2011

Volume 13, Issue 10

Pages 919–969, B333–B427

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Inside Front Cover
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Communications
    8. Editorial
    9. Research Articles
    10. Rapid Communication
    1. (Adv. Eng. Mater. 10/2011)

      Yanli Wang, Hanbing Xu, Donald L. Erdman, Michael J. Starbuck and Srdjan Simunovic

      Article first published online: 10 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201190026

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      Advanced 3D Digital Image Correlation is employed to characterize material mechanical behavior using high speed cameras at sub-Hopkinson regime (0.1 s−1 to 1000 s−1) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The 3D full field deformation map generated using this technique is shown in the figure. The material deformation in the area of interest is accurately recorded. In this paper, the stresses are calculated based on the elastic strains in the tab of a standard dog-bone shaped specimen (position A), and the stresses show little or no noise comparing to load cell signals for strain rates of 100 s−1 and lower. Reliable stress-strain curves are generated at these high strain rates. Further details can be found in the article by Y. Wang et. al. on page 943.

  2. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Inside Front Cover
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Communications
    8. Editorial
    9. Research Articles
    10. Rapid Communication
    1. (Adv. Eng. Mater. 10/2011)

      Wenke Friedrichs, Bastian Ohler, Walter Langel, Susanna Monti and Susan Köppen

      Article first published online: 10 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201190027

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      The Cover shows the multi-scale representation of the interactions between collagen fibrils and hydroxylated titanium oxide surfaces. Single contact points formed by individual residues, studied with quantum mechanical models, determine the adsorption behaviour of oligopeptides on flat surfaces. This in turn governs the adhesion of whole collagen nanofibrils, competing with the effects of surface roughness and intramolecular mechanical stiffness at larger length-scales, as captured by classical force-fields. Further details can be found in the article by S. Köppen et. al. on page 334.

  3. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Inside Front Cover
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Communications
    8. Editorial
    9. Research Articles
    10. Rapid Communication
    1. (Adv. Eng. Mater. 10/2011)

      Shyh-Chyang Luo, Bo Zhu, Aiko Nakao, Reiko Nakatomi and Hsiao-hua Yu

      Article first published online: 10 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201190028

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      The cover demonstrates a general approach to construct electrical conducting polymer nano-networks which allow cells to attach to the surface and proliferate. By controlling the oxidation polymerization and assembling rate, functionalized poly(3,4-ethylen edioxythiophene) (PEDOT) nano-networks are constructed. They display very low cytotoxicity and enable cell growth on top of the nanostructures. This provide a promising platform for cell engineering. Further details can be found in the article by Hsiao-hua Yu et. al. on page B423.

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Inside Front Cover
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Communications
    8. Editorial
    9. Research Articles
    10. Rapid Communication
    1. (Adv. Eng. Mater. 10/2011) (pages 919–925)

      Article first published online: 10 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201190025

  5. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Inside Front Cover
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Communications
    8. Editorial
    9. Research Articles
    10. Rapid Communication
    1. From Bio to Healthcare (page 927)

      Jörn Ritterbusch

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100248

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Inside Front Cover
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Communications
    8. Editorial
    9. Research Articles
    10. Rapid Communication
    1. A Study of Twin Variant Selection and Twin Growth in Titanium (pages 928–932)

      Lei Bao, Christophe Schuman, Jean-Sébastien Lecomte, Marie-Jeanne Philippe, Xiang Zhao and Claude Esling

      Article first published online: 15 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100055

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      An in depth analysis on twin variant selection and twin growth character during compression by means of “interrupted in situ” EBSD orientation measurement is carried out. An experimental verification and geometrical analysis of the use of Schmid's law as a criterion for selecting twin variants proves to be conclusive. Twin growth exhibits two modes: multiple variants system (MVS) and predominant variant system (PVS).

    2. Influence of Impact on the Mechanical Behaviour of the Gamma-Based TiAl Alloy TNBV3B (pages 933–942)

      S. Gebhard, P. Peters, D. Roth-Fagaraseanu and H. Voggenreiter

      Article first published online: 23 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100042

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      Generally, small particle impact (here produced with steel balls) on TiAl airfoil-like specimens causes front side and backside damage. Front side damage consists of a plastically deformed indent zone and potentially minor cracks, whereas the backside usually shows severer cracks. The influence of the different types of damage on the residual strength (quasi-statically) and on the post-impact fatigue behavior is investigated for a cast, forged, and extruded TNBV3B alloy.

    3. Characterization of High-Strain Rate Mechanical Behavior of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Using 3D Digital Image Correlation (pages 943–948)

      Yanli Wang, Hanbing Xu, Donald L. Erdman, Michael J. Starbuck and Srdjan Simunovic

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100048

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      Mechanical behavior of AZ31 magnesium alloy is successfully characterized at sub-Hopkinson regime (0.1–1000s−1) using a custom designed servo-hydraulic machine combined with 3D Digital Image Correlation technique. The stresses measured for strain rates of 100s−1 and lower show little or no noise. Overall, AZ31 exhibited slight work hardening without noticeable sacrifice of elongation within the studied regime.

    4. Texture-Induced Anisotropy in Asymmetrically Rolled Aluminium Alloys (pages 949–954)

      Jurij J. Sidor, Roumen H. Petrov and Leo A. I. Kestens

      Article first published online: 2 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201000353

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      The monoclinic texture symmetry in asymmetrically rolled (ASR) Al alloys ensures a nonconventional asymmetric Lankford value (r) profile. The recrystallization texture issued from the ASR process improves the average equation image value whereas the in-plane anisotropy does not benefit from the ASR process significantly. Results of analytical calculations show that improved normal anisotropy in the ASR sheets ensures increased limiting drawing ratio (LDR) of 2.11.

    5. Periodically Laser Patterned Fe[BOND]B[BOND]Si Amorphous Ribbons: Phase Evolution and Mechanical Behavior (pages 955–960)

      Sandip P. Harimkar, Sameer R. Paital, Gangyao Wang, Peter K. Liaw and Narendra B. Dahotre

      Article first published online: 30 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100098

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      In this paper, phase evolution and mechanical behavior of laser-patterned FeBSi amorphous ribbons are reported. The laser patterning with a lower fluence (12 J·cm−2) cause significant embrittlement of the alloy due to the structural relaxation. Partial crystallization of an amorphous alloy into α-Fe(Si) is also observed with laser patterning using higher laser fluences (15 and 17 J·cm−2).

    6. Microstructure and Nanoscale Piezoelectric/Ferroelectric Properties in La2Ti2O7 Thin Films Grown on (110)-Oriented Doped Nb:SrTiO3 Substrates (pages 961–969)

      Zhenmian Shao, Sébastien Saitzek, Pascal Roussel, Anthony Ferri, Émilie Bruyer, Adlane Sayede, Mohamed Rguiti, Olivier Mentré and Rachel Desfeux

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100105

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      Ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials are studied throughout the world due to their massive economic interest. They are used in various electronic devices such as sensors, nano/microelectromechanical Systems (N/MEMSs) and ferroelectric random access memory (FeRAM) devices.

  7. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Inside Front Cover
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Communications
    8. Editorial
    9. Research Articles
    10. Rapid Communication
    1. Facing Biointerfaces (page B333)

      Klaus D. Jandt

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201180042

  8. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Inside Front Cover
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Communications
    8. Editorial
    9. Research Articles
    10. Rapid Communication
    1. Adsorption of Collagen Nanofibrils on Rough TiO2: A Molecular Dynamics Study (pages B334–B342)

      Wenke Friedrichs, Bastian Ohler, Walter Langel, Susanna Monti and Susan Köppen

      Article first published online: 1 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201080123

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      In this study, results of classical molecular dynamics simulations of the hybrid collagen–titania interface are reported. For the titania surface model, two atomistic models for surface roughness are introduced. The collagen triple helix is capped by telopeptide structures. The adsorption of these structures is less influenced by surface roughness than the triple helix region.

    2. Layer-by-Layer Fabrication of Covalently Crosslinked and Reactive Polymer Multilayers Using Azlactone-Functionalized Copolymers: A Platform for the Design of Functional Biointerfaces (pages B343–B352)

      Maren E. Buck and David M. Lynn

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201080085

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      We report a method for modulating the physicochemical properties of surfaces that is based on the reactive layer-by-layer fabrication of covalently crosslinked polymer multilayers using azlactone-functionalized copolymers. Our results suggest the basis of methods that could be used to modulate or tune the density of chemical and biological functionality presented on surfaces of interest in a variety of fundamental and applied contexts.

    3. Enhanced Photostability of Fluoroquinolone Antibacterials Capped on Silver Nanoparticles (pages B353–B359)

      Salvatore Giuffrida and Salvatore Sortino

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201080112

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      Water-soluble Ag nanoparticles are effectively capped with FQ antibacterials exploiting electrostatic interactions between the two components. The resulting drug-protected metal nanoparticles exhibit remarkable photostability to light excitation and retain the fluorescent properties of the free drugs. These features together with the potential antimicrobial activity of the Ag nanocore make these hybrid systems interesting candidates in the perspective of multifunctional nanodrugs.

    4. Mechanically Switchable Biocide Plasma-Polymer Coatings for Biomaterials (pages B360–B368)

      Aissam Airoudj, Emilia Kulaga, Vincent Roucoules and Lydie Ploux

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201080075

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      A strategy to create antibacterial coatings based on (multi-)compartments alternating reservoirs and/or barriers and whose barriers can be opened up reversibly by stretching is presented. Functionalized stretchable surfaces are obtained by depositing a plasma-polymer film, a silver nanoparticles layer and a second, cross-linked plasma-polymer layer successively on PDMS. The second layer acts as a barrier and reduces the delivery of the silver nanoparticles into the surroundings. When such a film is stretched, cracks appear in the cross-linked layer, which allow the release of the silver species, while the release is reduced when the system is switched back.

    5. Nanomechanical Properties of Oligo(ethylene glycol methacrylate) Polymer Brush-Based Biointerfaces (pages B369–B376)

      Davide Tranchida, Elena Sperotto, Thorsten Staedler, Xin Jiang and Holger Schönherr

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201080129

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      Protein resistant polymer brushes of poly(diethylene glycol methylether methacrylate) (PDEGMA) are synthesized by surface-initiated polymerization (SIP) on gold and are thoroughly characterized with particular attention to the nano-mechanical properties. The non-specific adsorption of bovine serum albumine (BSA) is found to be very similar for PDEGMA brushes and related oligo(ethylene glycol) systems. The elastic properties are quantitatively determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation in buffered medium. The elastic modulus, evaluated according to Sneddon's model, of 800kPa shows that the DEGMA-based biointerfaces are indeed suitable for cell culture studies.

    6. A Parametrical Analysis on the Elastic Anisotropy of Woven Hierarchical Tissues (pages B377–B394)

      Qiang Chen and Nicola M. Pugno

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201080131

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      In this paper we develop a new theory to calculate the elasticity of hierarchical tissues. Our method shows the possibility of better understanding the elastic properties of biological nanomaterials and thus to mimic them. An application to the design of a new class of hierarchical 2-D scaffolds, by tailoring their elastic anisotropy in order to match that of the natural tissue and thus maximizing its regeneration at each hierarchical level, is finally discussed.

    7. Molding Micropatterns of Elasticity on PEG-Based Hydrogels to Control Cell Adhesion and Migration (pages B395–B404)

      Mar Diez, Vera A. Schulte, Filippo Stefanoni, Carlo F. Natale, Francesco Mollica, Claudia M. Cesa, Jingyu Chen, Martin Möller, Paolo A. Netti, Maurizio Ventre and Marga C. Lensen

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201080122

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      An innovative and versatile soft lithographic method is presented, which is denoted FIMIC (FIll-Molding In Capillaries). We have employed this method to fabricate smooth, hybrid surfaces with a micropattern of elasticity, using two hydrogel formulations with different crosslinking density. The hydrogels are prepared from PEG-based macromonomers that are liquid before crosslinking, which is an essential requirement for the FIMIC process. The resulting hybrid hydrogels with micropatterns of elasticity represent a very useful platform to study cell motility in dependence of substrate rigidity, e.g. “durotaxis”. The first cell culture results show that the fibroblasts selectively move around on and eventually adhere to the stiffer regions.

    8. Superductile, Wavy Silica Nanostructures Inspired by Diatom Algae (pages B405–B414)

      Andre P. Garcia, Nicola Pugno and Markus J. Buehler

      Article first published online: 29 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201080113

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      Diatom algae contain nanoporous hierarchical silicified shells, called frustules, which provide mechanical protection from predators and virus penetration. These frustules typically have a morphology resembling honeycombs within honeycombs, meshes, or wavy shapes, and are surprisingly tough when compared to bulk silica, which is one of the most brittle materials known. Our results demonstrate that tuning the geometric parameters of amplitude and width in wavy silica nanostructures are beneficial in improving the mechanical properties, including enhanced deformability, effectively overcoming the intrinsic shortcomings of the base material that features extreme brittleness. The material performance map shown here indicates the regions where optimum toughness, ductility, and strength are located with respect to width and amplitude.

    9. Biomimetic Pathways for Nanostructured Poly(KAMPS)/aragonite Composites that Mimic Seashell Nacre (pages B415–B422)

      Ranjith Krishna Pai, Lihua Zhang, Dmytro Nykpanchuk, Mircea Cotlet and Chad S. Korach

      Article first published online: 23 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201080136

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      The ability of the organic-inorganic components to “slide” internally leads to the toughening of the materials, though a recreation of seashell nacre at the nanoscale has yet to be shown. Here, we implement a poly(KAMPS)-based assembly which is carried out entirely from dilute aqueous solutions of the materials to create a “brick and mortar”-type aragonite structure mimics the platelets and interfacesand exhibits similar mechanics.

  9. Rapid Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Inside Front Cover
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Communications
    8. Editorial
    9. Research Articles
    10. Rapid Communication
    1. Functionalized Conducting Polymer Nano-Networks from Controlled Oxidation Polymerization toward Cell Engineering (pages B423–B427)

      Shyh-Chyang Luo, Bo Zhu, Aiko Nakao, Reiko Nakatomi and Hsiao-hua Yu

      Article first published online: 17 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201080109

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      Various functionalized conducting polymer nano-networks are synthesized by using 3,4-etheylenedioxythiophene dimer as the initiator in solvent with high polarity. The structure of the nano-network relies on the fine-tuning of solvent polarity and ratio of dimer seeds. These functionalized conduting polymer nano-networks are applied as substrate for cell proliferation with good biocompatibility.

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