Advanced Engineering Materials

Cover image for Vol. 14 Issue 11

Special Issue: Nanostructured Materials

November 2012

Volume 14, Issue 11

Pages 935–1041

Issue edited by: Werner Höppel, Reinhard Pippan, Christian Motz, Eric Le Bourhis

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Feature Article
    7. Research News
    8. Communications
    1. Front Cover Advanced Engineering Materials 11/2012

      Daniel Kiener, Petra Kaufmann and Andrew M. Minor

      Article first published online: 2 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201290038

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover shows the false color image of a failed nanoscale tensile specimen after loading in-situ in a transmission electron microscope. For details see the article by Kiener et al. on page 960.

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Feature Article
    7. Research News
    8. Communications
    1. Adv. Eng. Mater. 11/2012

      Article first published online: 2 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201290039

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Feature Article
    7. Research News
    8. Communications
    1. Adv. Eng. Mater. 11/2012 (pages 935–939)

      Article first published online: 2 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201290037

  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Feature Article
    7. Research News
    8. Communications
    1. Nanostructured Materials (page 941)

      Dr. Heinz Werner Höppel, Prof. Reinhard Pippan, Prof. Christian Motz and Prof. Eric Le Bourhis

      Article first published online: 26 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200306

  5. Feature Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Feature Article
    7. Research News
    8. Communications
    1. Critical Thickness Theory Applied to Micromechanical Testing (pages 942–947)

      D. J. Dunstan

      Article first published online: 2 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200017

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Critical thickness theory for the plastic deformation of small volumes is applied to the size effect observed in common micromechanical testing methods. The theory predicts an underlying strength inversely proportional to the size, above which other strengthening mechanisms may operate up to the conventional theoretical strength. Experiments designed to test these predictions are described.

  6. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Feature Article
    7. Research News
    8. Communications
    1. Cyclic Deformation Behavior of a 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel Processed by High Pressure Torsion (pages 948–954)

      Oliver Renk, Anton Hohenwarter and Reinhard Pippan

      Article first published online: 20 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200015

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High pressure torsion of a biocompatible 316L stainless steel leads to a significant grain size reduction down to 50 nm. Fatigue experiments show that it is possible to generate cyclically stable microstructures at stress levels three times higher than for the coarse-grained material. Testing of different microstructures allows for a better understanding of the fatigue behavior of such nanocrystalline metals.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Feature Article
    7. Research News
    8. Communications
    1. Plasticity Mechanisms in Sub-Micron Al Fiber Investigated by In Situ TEM (pages 955–959)

      Frédéric Mompiou and Marc Legros

      Article first published online: 18 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200020

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Single spiral sources operating in FIB defect free Al fibers were observed during in situ TEM experiments. The source is composed of a fixed arm (FA) around which a moving arm (MA) turns. The stress required to activate the source was estimated either from the curvature of the MA (red points) or from instrumented SEM tests (blue points) as a function of the fiber characteristic length d.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Strength, Hardening, and Failure Observed by In Situ TEM Tensile Testing (pages 960–967)

      Daniel Kiener, Petra Kaufmann and Andrew M. Minor

      Article first published online: 7 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200031

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Quantitative in situ tensile testing in the transmission electron microscope is used to investigate mechanical properties of single crystal copper samples. Specimens are fabricated by focused ion beam machining with dimensions between ≈100 and ≈200 nm and oriented for single or multiple slip, respectively. We evaluate strength, hardening behavior, and failure mechanism of these uniform tensile samples. Furthermore, a distinct strain rate effect on flow strength is demonstrated.

    3. Grain Boundary Segregation in UFG Alloys Processed by Severe Plastic Deformation (pages 968–974)

      Xavier Sauvage, Artur Ganeev, Yulia Ivanisenko, Nariman Enikeev, Maxim Murashkin and Ruslan Valiev

      Article first published online: 23 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200060

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Grain boundary segregations were investigated by atom probe tomography both in an ultrafine grain steel and in an aluminum alloy processed by severe plastic deformation. The unusually high solute concentrations that were measured are attributed to the “non-equilibrium” state of the boundaries. The mechanisms of these deformation induced segregations are discussed.

    4. Cyclic Cantilever Bending of Copper Nanowhiskers (pages 975–980)

      Carola Schopf, Matthias Schamel, Horst P. Strunk and Gunther Richter

      Article first published online: 24 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200036

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A cyclic cantilever bending test is proposed to investigate the onset of the elastic–plastic transition of copper nanowhiskers. The lower limit of the yield stress is determined at ≈5 GPa. The resulting shear stress compares well with theoretical predictions for deformation by partial dislocations.

    5. Strain-Induced Development of Very Fine Ferrite-Cementite Structures in Eutectoid Steels (pages 981–990)

      Matteo Caruso and Stéphane Godet

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200035

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hot deformation of undercooled austenite induces and accelerates the γ-to-pearlite transformation. Further straining leads to the instantaneous spheroidization of the cementite and refines the ferrite grain size to 3 µm. The initial grains undergo gradual fragmentation by generation of LABs that transform progressively into HABs. This phenomenon is attributed to the presence of cementite particles and is referred to as continuous dynamic recrystallization.

    6. Studying Plasticity in Hard and Soft Nb–Co Intermetallics (pages 991–997)

      Sandra Korte and William J. Clegg

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200175

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Microcompression has been used with transmission electron microscopy to study flow in a brittle Laves phase, NbCo2, shown left, and the related softer compound Nb2Co7. By measuring the orientation of the original pillar axis using EBSD, the slip system can be determined from the deformed pillar, allowing values of the critical resolved shear stress to be obtained and compared with existing data.

    7. Cu–Nb Nanocomposite Wires Processed by Severe Plastic Deformation: Effects of the Multi-Scale Microstructure and Internal Stresses on Elastic-Plastic Properties (pages 998–1003)

      Jean-Baptiste Dubois, Ludovic Thilly, Pierre-Olivier Renault and Florence Lecouturier

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200033

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High strength and high electrical conductivity nanocomposite wires composed of a multi-scale copper matrix reinforced by continuous niobium nanotubes are prepared by severe plastic deformation for the windings of high pulsed magnets. Tensile tests combined with diffraction shed light on the effects of the multi-scale microstructure and internal stresses on the wires elastic-plastic properties, revealing that microstructure architecture offers an additional degree of freedom in the tailoring of materials properties.

    8. Effect of Misorientation on the Compression of Highly Anisotropic Single-Crystal Micropillars (pages 1004–1008)

      Rafael Soler, Jon Mikel Molina-Aldareguia, Javier Segurado and Javier LLorca

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200019

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The effect of lattice rotation, micropillar tilt, and contact misalignment on the compression of anisotropic single crystals is assessed by means of crystal plasticity finite element simulations. The study is focused in single crystals with the NaCl structure, which present a very anisotropic plastic behavior as a result of the large difference in the CRSS between the two possible families of slip systems. The results show that in the case of “hard” directions for which the soft slip systems are not initially active, like the [111] direction, the loading stiffness and the flow stress can be greatly affected by small misalignments.

    9. Design of Graded Materials by Particle Reinforcement During Accumulative Roll Bonding (pages 1009–1017)

      Christian W. Schmidt, Mathis Ruppert, Heinz Werner Höppel, Frank Nachtrab, Anja Dietrich, Randolf Hanke and Mathias Göken

      Article first published online: 20 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200046

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Graded distributions of copper particles are produced within an ultrafine-grained aluminium sheet during accumulative roll bonding. The locally varying particle content is proven by tensile tests after a solution heat treatment. Different extent of solute content can be clearly seen in strength as well as electrical resistivity.

    10. Evolution of Strength and Homogeneity in a Magnesium AZ31 Alloy Processed by High-Pressure Torsion at Different Temperatures (pages 1018–1026)

      Yi Huang, Roberto B. Figueiredo, Thierry Baudin, François Brisset and Terence G. Langdon

      Article first published online: 20 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200016

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      There are no reports of the processing of the magnesium AZ31 alloy at room temperature either by equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) or high-pressure torsion (HPT) and, in addition, there has been no systematic study of the microstructure and strength introduced into the AZ31 alloy as a function of different HPT processing temperatures. This paper describes the microstructure and strength of the alloy after HPT processing at different temperatures.

    11. High Purity Ultrafine-Grained Nickel Processed by Dynamic Plastic Deformation: Microstructure and Mechanical Properties (pages 1027–1033)

      Lukasz Farbaniec, Akrum Abdul-Latif, Jenõ Gubicza and Guy Dirras

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200034

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The increased interest in ultrafine-grained materials resulted in the development of new processing techniques. This study presents dynamic plastic deformation method as an effective way of grain refinement in bulk sample of nickel down to the submicron level. Microstructural characterization shows that the microstructure evolves into lamellar and sub-grain structures. The subsequent mechanical properties are investigated by quasi-static compression tests. The effect of orientation of a lamellar structure with respect to the compression axis is analyzed.

    12. An In Situ Experimental-Numerical Approach for Characterization and Prediction of Interface Delamination: Application to CuLF-MCE Systems (pages 1034–1041)

      Murthy Kolluri, Johan P. M. Hoefnagels, Mohammad Samimi, Hans van Dommelen, Olaf van der Sluis and Marc G. D. Geers

      Article first published online: 8 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200110

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A combined in situ experimental-numerical approach for full characterization of interface behavior is presented, in which all CZ parameters are extracted from a combination of mixed-mode load-displacement responses, fracture toughness versus mode angle trends, and real-time microscopic observations of the delamination front. The accuracy and versatility of the approach is demonstrated on copper lead frame-molding compound epoxy samples, by comparison to self-adaptive CZ FEM simulations.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION