Advanced Engineering Materials

Cover image for Vol. 14 Issue 12

Special Issue: Highly Porous Metals and Ceramics

December 2012

Volume 14, Issue 12

Pages 1047–1138

Issue edited by: Paolo Colombo, H. Peter Degischer

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Feature Articles
    8. Communications
    1. Front Cover Advanced Engineering Materials 12/2012

      Sandro Gianella, Daniele Gaia and Alberto Ortona

      Version of Record online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201290041

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover shows Si-SiC foam heating element (courtesy Erbicol SA, CH). For details see the article by Ortona et al. on page 1074

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Feature Articles
    8. Communications
    1. Adv. Eng. Mater. 12/2012

      Version of Record online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201290042

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Feature Articles
    8. Communications
    1. Adv. Eng. Mater. 12/2012 (pages 1047–1050)

      Version of Record online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201290040

  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Feature Articles
    8. Communications
    1. Highly Porous Metals and Ceramics (page 1051)

      Paolo Colombo and H. Peter Degischer

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200347

  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Feature Articles
    8. Communications
    1. Lithography-Based Additive Manufacturing of Cellular Ceramic Structures (pages 1052–1058)

      Ruth Felzmann, Simon Gruber, Gerald Mitteramskogler, Passakorn Tesavibul, Aldo R. Boccaccini, Robert Liska and Jürgen Stampfl

      Version of Record online: 23 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200010

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In the current study a lithography-based additive manufacturing system is presented. By using this modified system, suspensions with a high solid loading of ceramic powders (up to 50 vol%) can be processed. Depending on the field of application, delicate customized parts made of alumina, β-tricalcium phosphate, and Bioglass® were fabricated and characterized.

  6. Feature Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Feature Articles
    8. Communications
    1. Formation of Hierarchically Porous Metal Oxide and Metal Monoliths by Nanocasting into Silica Monoliths (pages 1059–1073)

      Jan-Henrik Smått, Franchessa M. Sayler, Amy J. Grano and Martin G. Bakker

      Version of Record online: 23 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100355

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hierarchically porous Co3O4, α-Fe2O3, ZrO2, nickel, silver, and silver silicate monoliths have been prepared by nanocasting. A brief overview of the impact of the different processing steps, including precursor infiltration, decomposition, and template etching is given. Specific examples include the effects of calcination gas atmosphere, type of precursor, and template interaction strength.

    2. High Temperature Applications of Si[BOND]SiC Cellular Ceramics (pages 1074–1081)

      Sandro Gianella, Daniele Gaia and Alberto Ortona

      Version of Record online: 20 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200012

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      SiSiC cellular ceramics with porosity >80% and pore size from 40 to 10 PPI are exploited industrially in applications with high thermal loads, high temperatures and harsh environments. This work attempts to present the components in which SiSiC foams are currently applied because of their superior thermo-mechanical properties.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Feature Articles
    8. Communications
    1. Recent Trends in Aluminum Foam Sandwich Technology (pages 1082–1087)

      John Banhart and Hans-Wolfgang Seeliger

      Version of Record online: 26 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100333

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Aluminum foam sandwich (AFS) panels are now an industrially available product and have a range of real and possible applications. AFS combine various favorable physical and mechanical properties and can be prepared with a variety of surfaces attractive for designers and architects. The basics and recent improvements of foaming technology are explained and some applications presented.

    2. Filtration Performance of Membranes Produced Using Nanoscale Alumina Fibers (NAF) (pages 1088–1096)

      Veronica Su, Michael Terehov and Bill Clyne

      Version of Record online: 22 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200093

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Membranes have been produced from ultrafine (10 nm diameter) alumina fibers. Measured specific permeability values are consistent with the Carmen–Kozeny equation. Filtration efficiencies have been assessed, using two dyes, and found to be consistent with simple mechanical entrapment of the dye molecules. It is concluded that these membranes offer considerable promise as ultra-fine scale filters.

    3. Graded Cellular Ceramics from Continuous Foam Extrusion (pages 1097–1103)

      Bruno Ceron-Nicolat, Friedrich Wolff, Andrea Dakkouri-Baldauf, Tobias Fey, Helmut Münstedt and Peter Greil

      Version of Record online: 19 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200039

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cylindrical SiOC foam filaments with a radial gradient in pore cell size were processed by continuous extrusion foaming of a methyl polysilsesquioxane. After pyrolysis (800 to 1400 °C) the stabilized polymer gradient foams were converted into closed cell SiOC ceramic gradient foams. A superior compressive strength of 9 MPa and a Young's modulus of 7 GPa at a relative density of 0.18 were measured at an optimum pyrolysis temperature of 1000 °C.

    4. Cellular Ceramics Produced by Replication: A Digital Approach (pages 1104–1109)

      Claudio D'Angelo and Alberto Ortona

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100350

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This paper presents an algorithm to generate numerical models of replicated cellular ceramics with different struts thicknesses and thus relative densities, starting from a X-ray computed tomography of a polymeric foam. With these models different FE analysis can be performed. As an example, mechanical behavior is here studied.

    5. Extrusion Foaming of a Preceramic Silicone Resin with a Variety of Profiles and Morphologies (pages 1110–1115)

      Friedrich Wolff, Bruno Ceron Nicolat, Tobias Fey, Peter Greil and Helmut Münstedt

      Version of Record online: 18 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100351

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Preceramic foams with a variety of profiles and morphologies were fabricated by a continuous foam extrusion process. A methyl silicone resin was used as the preceramic polymer and CO2 as the foaming agent. Variations of the foam morphology were achieved by changing CO2 content, foaming pressure, and foaming temperature. Various foam profiles were extruded and pyrolysed into ceramic foams.

    6. Synthesis of a Ni-Containing Porous SiOC Material From Polyphenylmethylsiloxane by a Direct Foaming Technique (pages 1116–1122)

      Akira Idesaki and Paolo Colombo

      Version of Record online: 18 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100354

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A Ni-containing porous silicon oxycarbide (SiOC) material was produced from a blend of polyphenylmethylsiloxane (PPMS), azodicarbonamide and nickel(II) acetylacetonate by a direct foaming technique. Optimum condition for homogeneous foaming of PPMS was examined by controlling parameters such as the composition of starting mixture, the heating rate and the sample aspect ratio. Finally, a Ni-containing porous SiOC material with open porosity of 70% and high gas permeability was obtained.

    7. Ice Templating—An Alternative Technology to Produce Micromonoliths (pages 1123–1127)

      Michaela Klotz, Idris Amirouche, Christian Guizard, Céline Viazzi and Sylvain Deville

      Version of Record online: 20 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100347

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Zirconia micromonoliths prepared by the ice-templating method and sintered at high temperature present unique macroporous structures and mechanical properties of potential interest as catalyst carrier. The use of specific ice-shaping compounds in the ice-templating process leads to a honeycomb-like structure with hexagonally shaped microchannels running continuously throughout the micromonolith. The microchannels can be advantageously used for the deposition of a catalytically active meso/microporous layer, yielding a hierarchic porous structure which should facilitate access to the catalytic sites.

    8. Mechanical Properties of Monofilament Entangled Materials (pages 1128–1133)

      Loïc Courtois, Eric Maire, Michel Perez, David Rodney, Olivier Bouaziz and Yves Brechet

      Version of Record online: 24 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100356

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Monofilament entangled materials are a new type of materials with promising mechanical properties. They are made of a single wire randomly packed into a finite volume whose dimensions are much larger than the wire length, thus providing many self-contacts. Their complex internal architecture is investigated using X-ray tomography in order to link the microstructural evolution to the mechanical behaviour. This material exhibits very interesting properties in terms of vibration damping.

    9. Uniformly Porous MgTi2O5 with Narrow Pore-Size Distribution: XAFS Study, Improved In Situ Synthesis, and New In Situ Surface Coating (pages 1134–1138)

      Yoshikazu Suzuki, Tohru S. Suzuki, Yutaka Shinoda and Katsumi Yoshida

      Version of Record online: 23 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200049

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Porous MgTi2O5 ceramics with pseudobrookite-type structure have been prepared by in situ processing (viz. reactive sintering). In this paper, (1) X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) study of porous MgTi2O5, (2) improved in situ synthesis (i.e., more precise stoichiometric control), and (3) new “in situ surface coating,” are presented.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION